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Stanley 45 Combo Plane Overhaul #6: In the home stretch :-)

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Blog entry by HokieKen posted 01-31-2019 03:12 PM 826 reads 0 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Just some little bits... Part 6 of Stanley 45 Combo Plane Overhaul series Part 7: Does it Really Work??? »

I had a little bit of cleanup left to do. I put a couple of coats of Tru-Oil on the knob and tote. I also had the cam rest from CL810 that I hadn’t cleaned up yet.

Before.

After.

Then there was the slitter which I hadn’t payed any attention to yet. I cleaned it up on some wet dry paper to remove some surface corrosion. It was pretty dull so out came the diamond plates.

I quickly realized there was a lot of work to do on that little sucker and that it wasn’t all going to get done freehand. There is a chip in one cutting edge and a lot of pitting in spots on the bevel:

There is a lot of pitting at the back too:

So, I gave it a marginally passable edge on the side opposite the chip and let it go. Rather than grinding back past the chip and hoping for the best with the pitting, if I find the slitter is something I have use for, I’ll just make a new one from some O1 stock. This one isn’t worth the effort.

The final chore was putting some rust protection on the metal since I’d brushed it down to bare in most spots. I had kept it oiled since clean-up so I wiped the parts down to remove the oil. I decided to go with good old paste wax.

I put a coat on pretty much everywhere. I rubbed it into the stippled cast areas with the tooth brush and put a thin coat on the insides of holes with a q-tip.

I let it dry until it hazed over and buffed it out with a cotton rag. All the hardware bits got the same treatment except the threads. Threads got rolled in the block of Parrafin wax before being installed.

Now it was time to put it all back together :-)) I had taken plenty of pictures during disassembly to be sure I got all the screws and thumbscrews put back in the proper spots. First, I put the fence piece back together.

Next was the skate.

And finally the main body.

Then I put them all together with the rods.

I can see that making some longer rods for this guy is going to be a priority. These short ones strike me as pretty useless for anything other than rabbets or grooves really close to the edge. I have some bar stock so as soon as time permits, I’ll be turning some longer ones.

Looking back and comparing a “before” picture:

with a few “after” pictures:

I feel like the effort thus far has been time well-spent. I know looking nice won’t make it work better. But, it makes it more of pleasure to pick up and use for me.

I ain’t done though. I still have the functional elements to address! Like I said, I need to make some longer rods. And I have a whole set of the original cutters that came with this baby that I haven’t even taken out of the box yet. So, next time, I’ll pull the blades out and assess their conditions and get to sharpening.

Until then, thanks for dropping by :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!



26 comments so far

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

819 posts in 805 days


#1 posted 01-31-2019 03:18 PM

Wow… that is a thing of beauty! Nicely done.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View KelleyCrafts's profile

KelleyCrafts

3735 posts in 1155 days


#2 posted 01-31-2019 03:21 PM

Looking good! The tote and knob are absolutely stellar.

Before making a new slitter, if you find you need/want to use one, definitely throw that one on the worksharp. If you aren’t using it anyway then there’s no hard done if it’s pitted too much but if it works out then you’re all set. Just my thoughts.

Also, don’t forget to put your toothbrush back in the bathroom, I always seem to forget that when I use mine for stuff like this and then I have to walk all the way out to the shop before bed.

-- Dave - http://kelleycrafts.com/ - pen blanks - knife scales - turning tools

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16141 posts in 3035 days


#3 posted 01-31-2019 03:25 PM

Very nice work, that plane thanks you!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9911 posts in 1555 days


#4 posted 01-31-2019 03:29 PM

What would I do with a toothbrush in the bathroom?

Re Worksharp: I would have to make some sort of a jig to hold the slitter. Between the short length, shallow bevel and skewed edges, I would either miss the bevel angle terribly or (and far more likely) leave some skin on the abrasives… I think a hollow grind on the bench grinder followed by some time on the diamonds would be a much more effective method for me.

From virtually everything I’ve read about these planes though, it’s a non-issue ‘cause nobody uses the slitter anyway ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9911 posts in 1555 days


#5 posted 01-31-2019 03:29 PM

Thanks Bill and Smitty :-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16141 posts in 3035 days


#6 posted 01-31-2019 03:32 PM

Re: that slitter.

I put a passable edge on mine, and it’s installed ‘upside down’ on the plane so it stays out of the way of the rear depth stop. Wouldn’t want it sharper as my knuckles make contact every once in awhile. And to actually slit material, the straightest (tight) grain stock is needed; not likely stuff you’d think to first run roughshod w/ the 45 slitter to downsize.

My .02

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View JayT's profile

JayT

6226 posts in 2627 days


#7 posted 01-31-2019 03:35 PM

Looking good, Kenny. The plane, not you.

And you are correct about the slitter—I use my 45 frequently and have never used the slitter.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9911 posts in 1555 days


#8 posted 01-31-2019 03:37 PM

I tend to agree Smitty. When this thing was made at the turn of the 20th century, I could see the slitter being useful with thin stock. But, with tablesaws and bandsaws and ZCIs abounding these days, I can’t see the slitter being my chosen method of ripping thin stock…

Question: I was under the impression that the rear depth stop was for the slitter. Is that not the case?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9911 posts in 1555 days


#9 posted 01-31-2019 03:38 PM

We both look good JayT. I just didn’t take any pics of me. Maybe next time ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16141 posts in 3035 days


#10 posted 01-31-2019 03:52 PM


Question: I was under the impression that the rear depth stop was for the slitter. Is that not the case?

- HokieKen

I typically keep mine high, but for balance it can be set to match the front. And I occasionally do that. Up to you, really.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9911 posts in 1555 days


#11 posted 01-31-2019 03:56 PM

Ahhh, that makes sense :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

10698 posts in 2867 days


#12 posted 01-31-2019 04:18 PM

Nice clean up on aisle 45 Ken.

I haven’t used the slitter yet so it gets stored with the cutters.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3517 posts in 1804 days


#13 posted 01-31-2019 04:29 PM

Nice project Kenny. I don’t think that understand how this plane works. I’m going to have study some pictures a little more closely. Seems like the splitter should be in front of the cutter and with the bevels on the inside so that it scores a line prior the cutter to prevent chip out?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View sras's profile

sras

5108 posts in 3545 days


#14 posted 01-31-2019 04:35 PM

Well – that was certainly worth the effort!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9911 posts in 1555 days


#15 posted 01-31-2019 04:46 PM

Thanks Kev. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed working with this plane. It’s well made and it’s just some beautiful metal work.


Nice project Kenny. I don’t think that understand how this plane works. I’m going to have study some pictures a little more closely. Seems like the splitter should be in front of the cutter and with the bevels on the inside so that it scores a line prior the cutter to prevent chip out?

- Lazyman

The slitter:

Is actually used for just that, slitting. It’s for slicing pieces off of thin stock by making progressively deeper passes. The cutting edges are double beveled.

I think you thinking of the function of the “knickers” or “spurs”

which have single-bevel cutting edges. There is one on each skate and the flat edge registers flush with the edge of the skate which should also be aligned with the edges of the cutter.

These run ahead of the blade and score the wood to prevent tear-out in cross-grain cuts.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

showing 1 through 15 of 26 comments

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