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Stanley 45 Combo Plane Overhaul #1: A new pretty :-)

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Blog entry by HokieKen posted 01-23-2019 08:58 PM 753 reads 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Stanley 45 Combo Plane Overhaul series Part 2: General Cleanup »

Recently I decided it would be beneficial to have a rabbet plane in the shop. I don’t generally buy tools unless I know they’ll get used. I’ve had several times recently I’ve had to set up the router table or a dado stack in the table saw to cut a single rabbet and thought “there has to be a more efficient way”. So I had almost settled on buying a rabbet plane but then decided to poke my head into the Stanley #45 thread here on Lumberjocks and see if maybe that was a good alternative that would provide added function. And really, it’s just cool and I couldn’t really pass up an excuse to buy one ;-)

So Mosquito and the boys over there enabled me and Mos’ went a step further and offered to sell me one of his spares at a price I couldn’t turn down. So, a couple of days ago, this arrived on my porch:

Oh man, it’s soooooo cool. I wanna play with it! But first, I wanna make it pretty :-)

So I called this an “overhaul” rather than a restoration. I did so because I’m not intending to bring it back to its original condition. This is strictly a user. It didn’t arrive in collectible shape so I don’t feel bad about taking some leeway and making this puppy my own.

One of the first things to do will be to clean up all the rust. The thin nickel plating is flaking off in lots of places so I don’t know if I’ll make any attempts to preserve it. Never been a fan of that gray/green look anyway. I like my babies shiny or black… or both. Maybe with some red highlights (MF reference for those not familiar with my bench plane preferences ;-P) But don’t worry, I won’t take THAT much leeway and put red highlights on this guy. Probably.

Anyhow, I’ve been wanting to blog something so I feel like I’m contributing. So there’s the intro. And here’s a teaser for next time:

Until we meet again….

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!



10 comments so far

View KelleyCrafts's profile (online now)

KelleyCrafts

4098 posts in 1350 days


#1 posted 01-23-2019 09:03 PM

Just put bluing on the whole thing!!

Looking good. Super cool plane.

-- Dave - http://kelleycrafts.com/ - pen blanks - knife scales - turning tools

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4708 days


#2 posted 01-23-2019 09:14 PM

Looking forward to following your adventure.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12026 posts in 1749 days


#3 posted 01-23-2019 09:16 PM

Holy hell batman! I hadn’t even thought of blueing this thing. I’m not being facetious at all, I really dig that idea. You can pretty much bet that at least some part/parts will be blued now :-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12026 posts in 1749 days


#4 posted 01-23-2019 09:23 PM

In fact, let me throw this out in the comments section here…

I have a very strong feminine side evidently. I never knew it before but when I started researching these planes, one thing I absolutely wanted was the floral casting. So, in my artists’ leeway, I’ve been pondering a subtle way to highlight the floral pattern which is really a quite elegant highlight on a pretty graceful tool.

Any suggestions? I was considering painting the floral portions with black enamel like I use on bench planes then flat sanding the surfaces to remove the paint from the the details. But, I’m not sure that would look good given that the cast details aren’t flat. So then I pondered careful application of India ink in those areas but being careful to not get it on the raised details. Now, Dave has me wondering if blueing those areas might be desirable. The lower areas would probably go darker from the fluid pooling and the raised details would be blued but maybe not as dark as the depressions?

Any artsy-types care to weigh in?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4478 posts in 1193 days


#5 posted 01-23-2019 09:27 PM

I would brown before I would blue, but that’s me. But you could do both. Use a resist of some sort and then one treatment, then remove the resist and do the other treatment. Might need to experiment a little to determine the better order, but that’d be fun too.

Or you could full-on saw-art paint it. ;-)

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View KelleyCrafts's profile (online now)

KelleyCrafts

4098 posts in 1350 days


#6 posted 01-23-2019 09:29 PM

I was mostly serious on the bluing so you can be the test dummy. I agree on the floral design being a super cool accent on those but I think it’s better as an accent and not a stand out feature so I wouldn’t treat it special. The idea of the bluing puddling in the bottom making it darker might be as far as I would go with the thing to see if it does stand out more or not.

No paint for the floral stuff unless you’re painting the whole thing.

.02

-- Dave - http://kelleycrafts.com/ - pen blanks - knife scales - turning tools

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12026 posts in 1749 days


#7 posted 01-23-2019 09:32 PM



No paint for the floral stuff unless you re painting the whole thing.

- KelleyCrafts


I tend to agree.


I would brown before I would blue, but that’s me. But you could do both. Use a resist of some sort and then one treatment, then remove the resist and do the other treatment. Might need to experiment a little to determine the better order, but that’d be fun too.

Or you could full-on saw-art paint it. ;-)

- Dave Polaschek


That sounds like it might be interesting Dave. But was that in English? ;-) Seriously, I have no clue what “browning” is or what a resist is in this context. I am interested though!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4478 posts in 1193 days


#8 posted 01-23-2019 11:46 PM

Browning and bluing

A resist is like wax or the toner Allen bobasaurus uses for his etch. Something to keep the chemicals off the metal in the spots you’d like.

I’m not certain you could both brown and blue the same piece of metal, but you’re a clever guy.

Birchwood Casey Plum Brown works pretty well, but don’t do it in the kitchen. You will catch hell for that.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Oldschoolguy's profile

Oldschoolguy

103 posts in 447 days


#9 posted 01-24-2019 12:41 AM

Hey Ken, nice score bro!!!!!!! Roy, on the Woodright’s Shop would be envious. If there are those that haven’t ever seen the show, watch it. Utterly amazing!!!!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12026 posts in 1749 days


#10 posted 01-24-2019 03:02 PM

Thanks Dave. That does look interesting and I can see uses for the browning. I don’t think I like it for this plane though. It’s too sleek and svelte. Browning seems more suited for a big #8 or something :-)

Thanks Oldschool. I’m pretty excited. It’s been a while since I had a cool plane to make look and work like new. It’s a process I very much enjoy :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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