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Blog entry by EMann posted 02-22-2021 02:23 PM 302 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi i am new here and was woundering if i brought my spruce wood in my cabin im staying in. And i am using a pellet stove and a wood stove how long it would take for my wood to dry. Thanks E



5 comments so far

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1782 posts in 612 days


#1 posted 02-22-2021 04:35 PM

I think people are going to need the current moisture content and the thickness of the wood to help with this equation. If it is real fresh (wet) you may want to seal the ends to slow down the rapid loss there. I will just say a long time and you will want to lay them flat with stickers for air movement.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4701 posts in 2233 days


#2 posted 02-22-2021 05:17 PM

“Dry” heat from a wood stove helps but it really comes down to the humidity level the wood is stored at. I heat with wood exclusively and currently the house RH is about 13%.
Plenty of info here on LJ’s and the web on drying wood, but a general rule of thumb is 1 year per inch of thickness but like anything of this sort, YMMV.
(anon: Uncle Bob’s rule of thumb: “Don’t use your thumb as a rule or you’ll likely hit it with a hammer”)

View LittleBlackDuck's profile (online now)

LittleBlackDuck

6530 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 02-22-2021 10:42 PM

No idea how much inside heating will help, however, a pseudo-golden rule is 1 year per 1” in diameter.

Late amendment…

Oops. Didn’t fully read splinters comments above… however, I wouldn’t fully trust him… he uses rule of thumb while I use pseudo-golden rule... just look at his throbbing avatar.

Late, late amendment…
Welcome to LJ.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3607 posts in 4723 days


#4 posted 02-23-2021 05:05 AM

Inside drying might dry your lumber too fast depending on how hot your cabin gets from the wood heat and how consistent your temperature is. There’s a lot to know to get a good final product. If it is not stickered properly (uniformly) and sufficiently weighted, you can end up with some pretty unusable lumber. Air drying outdoors takes patience but can give you a more consistent product if you aren’t well versed in drying techniques. The one year per inch thickness of wood is for outdoor drying.

There are many articles on the web on air drying vs. kiln drying of lumber. We attempted indoor drying only once and had major problems with the humidity levels and needed dehumidifiers to reduce the moisture build-up on the walls. We considered building a kiln with better air control but, alas, we’re getting too old and probably have enough lumber for another lifetime.

We wish you much success with your endeavor.

L/W

-- “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” Benjamin Franklin -- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile (online now)

LittleBlackDuck

6530 posts in 1831 days


#5 posted 02-23-2021 10:05 AM


….. etc …...

We wish you much success with your endeavor.

L/W

- lightweightladylefty


Pretty good advice… better than the lame pseudo-golden rule...

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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