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Buick sedan 1932 #6: Grill, chapter 3 from the plan.

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Blog entry by Dutchy posted 02-05-2019 09:11 PM 641 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Engine, small parts, chapter 2 from the plan. Part 6 of Buick sedan 1932 series Part 7: Dashparts and fire screen, chapter 4 from the plan. »

During making the Buick Sedan I have made a lot of pictures and they will be used for this blog about the build process. This blog is mostly made in subdivisions according to the chapters of the building plan, but be aware that this is not the same as the chronological build. When questions are there feel free to ask. If I don’t know the answer there are a lot more LJ members which can and will help you.

There are many ways to build a wooden model and mine isn’t the best. Sometimes I have to redo it more often than I like. It also happens that after something is done I realize that there was a better way. And therefor feel free to comment when you think It can be done different or better.

x

6

11

16

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-- https://dutchypatterns.com/



13 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5678 posts in 2537 days


#1 posted 02-05-2019 10:25 PM

Neat.

A lot of work.

Beautifully done!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View htl's profile

htl

4468 posts in 1430 days


#2 posted 02-06-2019 12:17 AM

That is one beautiful radiators and bonnet, nice work.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View sras's profile

sras

4993 posts in 3400 days


#3 posted 02-06-2019 03:25 AM

The craftsmanship is impressive!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Jason1974's profile

Jason1974

151 posts in 593 days


#4 posted 02-06-2019 04:41 PM

Beautiful

-- Jason, Camden, NC -- MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE, THEN FORCE IT TO FIT.

View stefang's profile

stefang

16391 posts in 3605 days


#5 posted 02-08-2019 06:03 PM

Thanks Jan. I have filed this away in my memory for future reference. I hope you saved that sawdust for filling small holes after all the effort creating it!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3262 posts in 2439 days


#6 posted 02-08-2019 06:32 PM



Thanks Jan. I have filed this away in my memory for future reference. I hope you saved that sawdust for filling small holes after all the effort creating it!

- stefang

I thought to make coarse ground coffee from it, it was to rough for filling.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2174 posts in 1091 days


#7 posted 02-09-2019 08:50 AM

That’s some serious rotary usage,

What did you use as a guide to get those straight even spaced lines… unless that’s a fake photo and you did it on a router table…

OK smarty pants,

how did you sand the inside on the disk sander?

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3262 posts in 2439 days


#8 posted 02-09-2019 09:05 AM



That s some serious rotary usage,

What did you use as a guide to get those straight even spaced lines… unless that s a fake photo and you did it on a router table…

- LittleBlackDuck

Next episode you will see more.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3262 posts in 2439 days


#9 posted 02-09-2019 09:07 AM


how did you sand the inside on the disk sander?

- LittleBlackDuck

This was done by the scrollsaw and NOT sanded at all, way too dangerous.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View htl's profile

htl

4468 posts in 1430 days


#10 posted 02-09-2019 02:55 PM

Love it one of my favorite techniques but that’s one really little bit!

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3262 posts in 2439 days


#11 posted 02-09-2019 04:12 PM



Love it one of my favorite techniques but that s one really little bit!

- htl

The smallest I have is 0,8 mm, but never used. The one on the picture is 1,6mm. They are intent to use on PCB’s and made from TC and for that reason sharp for a “long” time. When you interested in more information google PCB router bit. But be aware that if you are use this bits with manual feed they will easily break.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View htl's profile

htl

4468 posts in 1430 days


#12 posted 02-09-2019 08:46 PM

I’ve got the 1/8 inlay set but just have never got around to playing with it.
I keep hearing how brittle they are so I’ll just have to stick to my big fat Dewalt 7 1/4” blades.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2174 posts in 1091 days


#13 posted 02-09-2019 11:59 PM

how did you sand the inside on the disk sander?

- LittleBlackDuck

This was done by the scrollsaw and NOT sanded at all, way too dangerous.

- Dutchy


Was just kidding Dutchy... I agree, scrollsaws are way too dangerous… and even more so when you put a blade into it… and gets worse if it’s a sharp blade… I’m still too chicken to tighten the blade tension on mine!
Nearly lost an eye trying to blow the dust of the cut until someone told me that the segmented air hose was not designed to blow cold air into the operator’s face to keep the flies away…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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