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Automated table saw fence and router table #1: Finished most of the mechanical construction and control software

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Blog entry by DocWithManyHats posted 06-15-2021 07:19 PM 1410 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Automated table saw fence and router table series Part 2: Added homing sensor and a secondary variable angle fence »



15 comments so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

18733 posts in 2143 days


#1 posted 06-15-2021 10:52 PM

it’s pretty damn cool but not something id ever find useful.what is the accuracy? one problem is the screen,hopefully you have an alternate way to mount it because where it’s at would be right in the way.id mount it right on the fence itself so it would just ride with it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

78 posts in 3765 days


#2 posted 06-15-2021 11:23 PM

I’m working on another app to make customized box joints and dovetails on the fly using this system. That was the main inspiration to make it. That, and I like making my own tools.

The tablet is connected by bluetooth, so it can be mounted anywhere. I can also just use my phone instead of the tablet, or not use the electronics if I don’t want to.

I haven’t done real world accuracy tests yet, but theoretically less than a thousandth of an inch.

View pottz's profile

pottz

18733 posts in 2143 days


#3 posted 06-16-2021 12:45 AM

too have an automated box joint and dove tail ability, now that would get my interest.+- a thou is good enough for my needs.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1944 posts in 885 days


#4 posted 06-16-2021 12:54 AM

I think it needs to be refined as the one below.
I like the ability to punch in the measurement and the fence goes there.
Kind of like the Tiger Stop system, which you can program for multiple cuts as well.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

873 posts in 938 days


#5 posted 06-16-2021 01:03 AM

Very well done. 3d printing has made axis management so accessible and your designed interface to the saw is functional and compact.

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

78 posts in 3765 days


#6 posted 06-16-2021 01:09 AM



I think it needs to be refined as the one below.
I like the ability to punch in the measurement and the fence goes there.
Kind of like the Tiger Stop system, which you can program for multiple cuts as well.

- LeeRoyMan

Needs to be refined for what purpose?

Mine has the same functionality, along with offsets, and router table. I also wanted the ability not to have to use electronics and just use it like a regular fence, which I have.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1944 posts in 885 days


#7 posted 06-16-2021 01:11 AM

OK, I just thought it was to big and bulky.

Good Luck with it!

View cokernutt's profile

cokernutt

3 posts in 720 days


#8 posted 06-16-2021 07:41 PM

As an automation engineer and a woodworker I can appreciate this on multiple levels. This is pretty cool! A couple of questions, are you using stepper motors or servos? I assume you can zero or home the router lift to any position? An absolute encoder on the router lift would eliminate the need for the distance sensor and likely provide better resolution. Or, if money isn’t an obstacle, you could use a linear actuator.
Good job!

-- Scott

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

78 posts in 3765 days


#9 posted 06-16-2021 08:15 PM


As an automation engineer and a woodworker I can appreciate this on multiple levels. This is pretty cool! A couple of questions, are you using stepper motors or servos? I assume you can zero or home the router lift to any position? An absolute encoder on the router lift would eliminate the need for the distance sensor and likely provide better resolution. Or, if money isn t an obstacle, you could use a linear actuator.
Good job!

- cokernutt

Thank you. That is high praise coming from a professional.

I’m using steppers and may incorporate a linear scale on the fence in the future, so I can move seamlessly between manual and automatic positioning of the fence. That isn’t a priority right now though.

I’m not sure I follow you about the absolute encoder. I would still need to re-zero as I change bits since they would stick out different amounts, wouldn’t I?

View zzzzdoc's profile

zzzzdoc

574 posts in 4161 days


#10 posted 07-05-2021 02:39 PM

Is that Rip-It fence actually commercially produced? It looked like a failed Kickstarter campaign, although it did look pretty cool. Nothing on their Kickstarter page for the last 3 years.

The price of the TigerFence is – OMG!!!

So there may be a market for what you are building.

The next thing you need to integrate is a pusher to push wood through the blade. The combo would be amazing.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1747 posts in 813 days


#11 posted 07-05-2021 03:46 PM

Being a software engineer focused on automation and workflow efficiency I think this has serious potential. What I’d really like to see is the ability to send a cut diagram to the table saw and it determines the most efficient way to break down sheet goods. Or let me pull up the cut diagram on the screen and just tap a shape and the fence auto sets for that piece. Of course none of that is remotely necessary in a hobby shop but I still think it would be really freaking cool.

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

78 posts in 3765 days


#12 posted 07-06-2021 02:32 AM


Is that Rip-It fence actually commercially produced? It looked like a failed Kickstarter campaign, although it did look pretty cool. Nothing on their Kickstarter page for the last 3 years.

The price of the TigerFence is – OMG!!!

So there may be a market for what you are building.

The next thing you need to integrate is a pusher to push wood through the blade. The combo would be amazing.

- zzzzdoc

I haven’t followed the Rip-it product. It seems like a nice design, but I wanted the ability to use my saw without electronics too.

How much are the tigerfences? I never looked into it as I’m just a hobbyist.

Can you elaborate bit about what you mean by pushing the wood through the saw? Do you mean in an automated fashion with a motor or manually? I’m almost done designing a removeable sliding miter fence that attaches to the main fence and could be used for both the table saw and router table portions. I was considering motorizing it in the future, but that is way down on the list of things I still have to design, make and code.

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

78 posts in 3765 days


#13 posted 07-06-2021 02:42 AM



Being a software engineer focused on automation and workflow efficiency I think this has serious potential. What I d really like to see is the ability to send a cut diagram to the table saw and it determines the most efficient way to break down sheet goods. Or let me pull up the cut diagram on the screen and just tap a shape and the fence auto sets for that piece. Of course none of that is remotely necessary in a hobby shop but I still think it would be really freaking cool.

- sansoo22

Both of those scenarios would be pretty cool. The latter I think I could manage – clicking on a cut diagram and having the saw automatically take care of it. Determining the most efficient way to break down sheet goods feels like it would be challenging to program, but doable. I think I would learn a lot doing it.

I want to finish my joinery software before I seriously contemplate other features.

View mawilsonWCR's profile

mawilsonWCR

44 posts in 159 days


#14 posted 07-26-2021 11:39 AM

...the ability to send a cut diagram to the table saw and it determines the most efficient way to break down sheet goods.

The process you describe is called ‘nesting’ and it’s typically done before tool path generation prior to sending data to the CNC machine. Think encapsulation or separation of concerns.
Or let me pull up the cut diagram on the screen and just tap a shape and the fence auto sets for that piece.

Overall, it sounds like you want a CNC router which can also cut shapes a table saw can’t.

-- No trees were harmed while sending this message; however, a rather large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

78 posts in 3765 days


#15 posted 07-26-2021 02:30 PM


...
Overall, it sounds like you want a CNC router which can also cut shapes a table saw can t.

- mawilsonWCR

I designed and built a muliaxis cnc (take a look at my projects for an idea of the 3d milling I do). I used the cnc to cut the aluminum for my fence and router system. This system and the cnc both have their place in my workshop and serve some overlapping functions.

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