LumberJocks

Laundry hamper #2: Beads

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Blog entry by Dave Polaschek posted 08-27-2021 04:56 PM 468 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Introduction and doors Part 2 of Laundry hamper series Part 3: Slats and frame pieces for another door »

Not a lot of progress today. I cut beads on the frame pieces for the door using the combination plane. Spent most of the morning fixing my sticking board so it could handle me beading ash.

But I got the first stick done and am happy with it. The next three went pretty quickly after that.

With those four done, I think I’ll smooth and cut the pieces for the second door next, while I still have the same beading setup in my combination plane. Guess I may need to get a second one if I end up doing more of this sort of thing.

You may also notice I didn’t quite get all the way to the bottom with the beading blade. That’s tough in ash, and three of my four sticks had the grain running the wrong way, so I’d get lots of tear-out. I may just finish up the sticks “backwards” with a gouge once I have them all done.

-- Dave - Santa Fe



14 comments so far

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2150 posts in 967 days


#1 posted 08-27-2021 05:42 PM

Yeah, that ash is pretty hard. Routers for me. lol

One of the beauties of Sketchup, making changes without starting over or erasing and making a mess on your paper.
Not trying to talk you into SU, just playing, and showing some of the uses.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#2 posted 08-27-2021 07:32 PM

Yeah. I get why people use routers. I figure I’m doing this as a hobby, and if it takes me a little longer, that’s fine. Plus, it wasn’t until I looked at the sticks this morning that I decided I needed the bead. Which meant that I’m definitely mitering the front of the corners of the frame, so I’ll probably do half-lap joints with mitered fronts.

I get why folks use sketchup, but I also don’t need to actually have everything drawn. I could see how the corners would need to come together without drawing anything. The main unanswered question I have left is whether I’m going to make the lattice slats ⅜” thick, and taper the ends and edges a little (so they’ll fit into the ¼” grooves in the frame) or just make them ¼” thick out of the gate. I suspect I’ll cut them all ⅜ thick when I’m milling the lumber, and then see how much planing I need to get everything smooth. But if they’re only ¼ thick, I might not need to cut reliefs in the slats, and I could maybe just weave them. At ⅜” thick, I will definitely need to make cuts.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View pottz's profile

pottz

20624 posts in 2224 days


#3 posted 08-27-2021 07:50 PM

lookin good dave i agree it’s a hobby no rush needed,just enjoy the process.but im all for the router for something like this.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3321 posts in 3430 days


#4 posted 08-27-2021 08:13 PM

I try to use molding planes, not always with success due to grain issues. One way to overcome that however, is to make & use a scratch stock. Scratch stocks work pretty good with or against the grain, and work well on curves. Once the iron is shaped, it’s all downhill from there. I needed a bead on an oval arch and the scratch saved the day:

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#5 posted 08-27-2021 08:14 PM

Thanks, Pottz. I figure my combo plane is fine for this. Biggest problem was getting the blade depth set right so it wasn’t being too aggressive, but was still taking enough of a cut that I could follow the grooves with the plane. And a single quarter-inch bead is a fairly tough cut. When it’s just the two edges cutting, it goes really easily, but when the full width of the curve starts cutting, it’s a lot tougher.

Works like a depth-stop, I guess. I sure know when I’m down to that point.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#6 posted 08-27-2021 08:28 PM

Yeah, Tom. Thanks! A scratch stock may be just the ticket to clean up the last of the bead. I’d rather get the nice clean finish I get with a plane, but as I mentioned in part 1, I’ve got at least one bum molding plane (my #10 has a tiny crack that prevents me from setting the wedge firmly enough to actually hold the blade when cutting ash). I think I’ll still try to freehand the curve with a gouge, but if that doesn’t work, a scratch-stock will be next on my go-to list.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View crowie's profile

crowie

5014 posts in 3191 days


#7 posted 08-27-2021 10:59 PM

Dave, You did that with hand tools, hats off to you sir.
That’s a craftsman enjoying the working with wood for sure.

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#8 posted 08-28-2021 12:15 AM

Thanks, Peter! Sharp helps an awful lot with hand tools, plus paying attention to the grain (which I didn’t do so well on these). The next set of four sides should go quicker.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

10696 posts in 3283 days


#9 posted 08-28-2021 12:20 AM

That’s all you got done today? Sounds like you’re retired or something.
Progress is progress especially without power tools.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#10 posted 08-28-2021 12:43 AM

Yeah, that was about two and a half hours this morning, Dave. I was hoping to get some time this afternoon, but had to go to the farmers market instead.

We also watered plants (an hour and change), went for a walk (an hour), took a nap (also an hour), and cooked dinner.

Retirement isn’t half bad. ;-)

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View mafe's profile

mafe

13333 posts in 4329 days


#11 posted 09-04-2021 05:09 PM

Dinner looks good, but I prefer that combination plane.
Nice work on the profiles.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#12 posted 09-04-2021 05:16 PM

Thanks, Mads! I’m hoping the profiles can hide some of the smaller mistakes. ;-)

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View mafe's profile

mafe

13333 posts in 4329 days


#13 posted 09-04-2021 08:08 PM

It’s called charm, not mistakes. ;-)

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#14 posted 09-04-2021 08:22 PM

Ahh, yes. They will definitely be charming, my friend!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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