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Forge table #7: Undercarriage and attaching the legs

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Blog entry by Dave Polaschek posted 01-09-2021 05:19 PM 353 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Turning the legs Part 7 of Forge table series Part 8: Undercarriage »

I did some work to build the undercarriage. I couldn’t decide whether I wanted the stretchers to cross over or meet in a hub, but when I test fit things, it became clear I couldn’t have them cross without bending them.

So I turned a hub (from a scrap of salt cedar) for the four stretchers to meet in and bored a couple holes through it.

Unfortunately, I didn’t think that the holes wouldn’t meet at right angles, but since the table-top is a rectangle, they don’t. Oh well. As Bandit says, we have ways.

I found a half-inch dowel in the scrap pile, and used that for alignment. I’ll worry about the actual stretcher later. For now I just need something so I can get the leg rotated correctly before gluing it into place.

So, test fit time again. And with the legs in place, I drew lines on the ends of their tenons, perpendicular to the grain of the tabletop, so the wedges won’t split that, and sawed in slots for the wedges.

And then it was time to prep some wedges. Cut them on the bandsaw and plane the faces smooth.

Then show them to the holes and trim roughly to size.

Then plane the edge smooth. They don’t need to be perfect, but they need to fit, and not be so rough that they’ll get hung up halfway in.

Then the glue bottle gets opened, and I’m not smart enough to take pictures while gluing things up, but the process is: glue on the tenon and in the mortise; seat the leg in the tabletop, splaying it as much to the outside as it will go; glue on the wedge, and pound the wedge home (using Earl’s dice mallet – thanks again, buddy!). Repeat four times, rinse out the glue brush, double check everything, and then write this up.

I’ll get the undercarriage glued up either after lunch or tomorrow. The stretchers will be glued and wedged at the leg ends, and probably just glued at the hub in the middle.

-- Dave - Santa Fe



14 comments so far

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

264 posts in 2011 days


#1 posted 01-09-2021 05:39 PM

Looking good Dave

Neat fix with the hub, I’d have probably just half lapped the stretchers where they crossed. Hub looks better.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6677 posts in 1559 days


#2 posted 01-09-2021 05:46 PM

I thought about that, Mike, but I decided I liked Tinker Toys better than Lincoln Logs this week. Plus, after writing this up, I found an ash scrap which will make four 3/4 or maybe a full inch diameter stretchers, and then I can use my tapered reamer to open the holes in the hub and correct the direction on them a little so everything looks like “I meant to do that!”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJXU7EVXs2A

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

264 posts in 2011 days


#3 posted 01-09-2021 05:57 PM

Had to google that to see what you were talking about, I’d vaguely heard of Tinker Toys but not Lincoln Logs.

We had Meccano & Lego instead.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6677 posts in 1559 days


#4 posted 01-09-2021 06:04 PM

Ahh, yeah. I had enough Lincoln Logs to build a presidential palace. US-centric of me, though.

Had about five gallons of legos, too. There were a couple years where nearly all my allowance went to Lego blocks.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

10024 posts in 3019 days


#5 posted 01-09-2021 06:42 PM

I’m a tinker toy man myself Dave, forget the Lincoln logs. If you had a steamer you could bend those stretchers to meet the hub and legs. Did it on a table with a floating shelf and ran into the same problem as you, didn’t realize it. Actually looked cool with the arc in it. I definitely like the hub, it gives it a wagon wheel effect.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View ColoradoJake's profile

ColoradoJake

27 posts in 623 days


#6 posted 01-09-2021 07:25 PM

That is a really nice table. I agree that the hub looks nicer than crossed stretchers. Good choice.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6677 posts in 1559 days


#7 posted 01-09-2021 08:56 PM

Thanks, Dave & Jake. We’ll see how it looks after I turn four new stretchers from the ash scrap I found, but I’m thinking the hub was the right choice.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3158 posts in 3167 days


#8 posted 01-09-2021 09:21 PM

Nice work Dave, as far as I can, you meant to use a hub from the start. Like the video too, funny.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6677 posts in 1559 days


#9 posted 01-09-2021 09:35 PM

Thanks, Tom! I probably did, but I was thinking about half-lapping the stretchers at one point. Or drilling the holes offset enough that they’d just pass close to each other, but I forgot to do that part, so here we are.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View crowie's profile

crowie

4236 posts in 2927 days


#10 posted 01-09-2021 10:11 PM

And here wad I thinking the legs were done so the table could be assembled BUT no so.
The wedge fixing is very fancy Dave and is showing your craftsmanship.

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

4425 posts in 2301 days


#11 posted 01-09-2021 10:14 PM

Nice re-work with the hub Dave. Coming along.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6677 posts in 1559 days


#12 posted 01-09-2021 10:24 PM

Thanks, Peter. It’ll probably be assembled tomorrow or Monday. I’m turning four new stretchers from ash. As for the staked legs, they’re one of the simplest ways I know of to attach legs, plus as long as there’s nice clean shoulders on the tenons, they should be solid as a rock.

Thanks, Duck. It’s getting closer, and should be nice and solid once I get the legs all trimmed to the exact same length.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1045 posts in 2269 days


#13 posted 01-10-2021 07:21 PM

Dave that’s one fancy forge table. Looks like yor becoming an expert at the lathe.
I may have missed it in the photos or comments. Did you drill relief holes 1/8” to 3/16” above the shoulders at the end of the slots to prevent splitting?

-- James E McIntyre

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6677 posts in 1559 days


#14 posted 01-10-2021 09:31 PM

Well, it’s probably a practice table for something in the future too, James. Thanks. If I hadn’t been fiddling with the lathe and turning legs, I would’ve made one with octagonal legs in probably a quarter the time.

No relief holes. The slots won’t split because they end inside the mortise in the top of the table. I also tried to pick pieces with little to no grain run-out on the end that the tenon is on.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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