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Forge table #5: Tenons on the legs

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Blog entry by Dave Polaschek posted 01-05-2021 03:23 AM 392 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Roughing the legs Part 5 of Forge table series Part 6: Turning the legs »

Short day today. Many other errands around the house.

I did find time to put tenons on the legs that match the holes I drilled in the table-top months ago.

The first two went well

And then on the third one, I had a little oopsie.

I guess the new plan is that the legs will all be two inches shorter than I had initially planned (I’ll saw the extra off the bottoms, which means no carved feet, either). Ah well. It was a good day otherwise.

-- Dave - Santa Fe



11 comments so far

View WhattheChuck's profile

WhattheChuck

451 posts in 4570 days


#1 posted 01-05-2021 03:27 AM

Well, these things happen!

My son’s stake desk lost about 1” in similar fashion!

-- Chuck, Pullman, WA

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6858 posts in 1592 days


#2 posted 01-05-2021 04:21 AM

Yep. Probably should’ve stayed out of the shop entirely, as I only had about an hour. Oh well. It’ll work out.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3165 posts in 3201 days


#3 posted 01-05-2021 10:29 AM

Opps! Well, there’s a bumper sticker that refers to outcomes like this, something about something – “Happens”.

This reminds me of a question I posted back when I was attempting to turn silver maple legs for my last posted project, about chunks of wood coming off in lieu of shavings. I still don’t understand why, due to having prior turned legs for the bed I made from cherry, all went well then, so I’m blaming the wood.
Probably was me though, either technique or tool sharpness, just not experienced enough at turning to determine which.
Keep on persevering though, the fun is in the process.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View crowie's profile

crowie

4333 posts in 2961 days


#4 posted 01-05-2021 10:43 AM

You just epoxy the bits together….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6858 posts in 1592 days


#5 posted 01-05-2021 12:22 PM

Yeah, Tom. I’ll stick with it, just a short setback.

Peter, I could’ve probably glued the bits together, but as I’m working without a plan, making the legs a couple inches shorter works, too. These are going to be wedged tenons, so I’d rather saw problem than maybe find another crack as I drive the wedge into the end of the tenon, and while everything is covered in glue.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

10144 posts in 3053 days


#6 posted 01-05-2021 01:43 PM

Dave, that usually happens on the last one. Couldn’t you have drilled it out and glued in the appropriate size dowel?

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6858 posts in 1592 days


#7 posted 01-05-2021 01:53 PM

Still could, Dave. But the old legs were right at the limit of the length my lathe can handle, and I’m planning to turn some decorative features on the legs yet, so shortening them all by two inches doesn’t seem like a bad plan. If I have another problem, I’ll start looking to patching things up.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6647 posts in 2397 days


#8 posted 01-05-2021 10:08 PM

I hate it when that happens. From the picture it sort of looks like it split perfectly in half. One thing that could have contributed is having the tail stock point pressing in and basically trying to wedge it apart. If that was a contributor, a cup center can help prevent that by limiting how far in the center point can penetrate.

What tool were you using when this happened?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6858 posts in 1592 days


#9 posted 01-05-2021 10:39 PM

Yeah, the tail stock center point helped it split, and I was using the roughing gouge to hog off about a half inch of material for the tenon, so I was taking a pretty aggressive bite, and the gouge was starting to need a sharpening. So multiple things contributed, I suspect.

When I sawed off the end and started turning down a new tenon, I had the point of the tail stock slip and tear out of the the end, probably because I hadn’t tightened it down. Solved that by sawing off a quarter inch or so and using a spare drive spur in the tail-stock as a live center, which solved the problem. Upon closer inspection, there was a spot of weak grain running nearly up the center of that leg, and I probably should just junk it and start with a new one, but I’m learning a lot as I go, so I guess you could say it’s good I stuck with this piece of wood.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6647 posts in 2397 days


#10 posted 01-06-2021 04:21 AM

I usually save my whoops to use as a good practice blank for experimenting, learning and practicing. If it has a crack, you may be able to dribble some CA into it and clamp it for a few minutes to stabilize it. I’ve also just wrapped it with a few layers of tape.

After getting it round with a roughing gouge or bowl gouge, a skew pealing cut is my go-to for cutting a tenon like that. Second choice would be a parting tool. The pealing cut is probably the least scary skew operation to learn, though until I did the first one it scared me more than the other typical skew cuts.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6858 posts in 1592 days


#11 posted 01-06-2021 04:33 AM

It’s not a crack, Nathan. More a weak spot in the wood that’s prone to cracking.

I do a peeling cut with the skew after hogging off 90% of the wood with the roughing gouge. I need about a 1.5” long tenon, so the parting tool didn’t feel right. Worked just fine for the other three legs, but this one wanted to teach me who was boss, apparently, but I turned the tenon on it while mixing up some shellac today, and it’s done.

Tomorrow we’ve got appointments in town, but Thursday I can hopefully shape the legs a bit, once I figure out where on the legs I’m going to put the stretchers. And I guess I need to make some stretchers, too,

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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