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Baby bow saw #5: Test run

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Blog entry by Dave Polaschek posted 12-29-2020 05:18 PM 722 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Cleaning up the surfaces Part 5 of Baby bow saw series Part 6: Kolrosing »

So at the urging of a few people who wanted to know how the saw would cut, I put it together this morning and cut a curve in some ¾ pine. Nothing tricky, but the kind of thing I end up doing a lot.

I put in a new Pegas Coping Skip 6.5” 18tpi blade, and tightened it up. I took it to about an A#, just above A440Hz. That’s an octave below the tension I normally have in the metal-framed coping saw, but it feels more solid. I’ll tighten it up further after I re-tie the string a little tighter. Currently it took over a dozen turns to get to this tension because the string is fairly loose when straight.

The saw cuts reasonably well, and while I didn’t hit any places where I was turning so sharply it would bind, the tension in the blade would’ve kept that from happening.

The two things I noticed were that it has a shallower throat (not surprising, that’s how I built it) so I had to approach the cut differently, and the wood flexes less, which makes it feel more solid in use.

I’ll keep the metal framed coping saw around, probably with a coarse blade for wasting away wood in a hurry, but I suspect this one will get a lot of use in the future.

-- Dave - Santa Fe



17 comments so far

View WhattheChuck's profile

WhattheChuck

467 posts in 4852 days


#1 posted 12-29-2020 05:23 PM

Nice! Gotta use my own (seldom-used) coping saw today. So I’ll be thinking about your construction.

Mine doesn’t inspire..

-- Chuck, Pullman, WA

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8849 posts in 1874 days


#2 posted 12-29-2020 06:14 PM

Thanks, Chuck! It was a pretty simple build to just get something functional. Cut a few pieces to length, and cut a couple mortises and tenons. The sad thing is that the pin kit from Gramercy Tools costs more than the metal-framed coping saw, so it kind of needs to be a labor of love.

Then again, I would be highly unlikely to spend a couple days decorating a metal coping saw, too. This one will definitely get some decorative treatment before I call it “done.”

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3354 posts in 3482 days


#3 posted 12-29-2020 07:56 PM

OK, it works, no surprise here, good job. Maybe in lieu of the string a leather boot lace would provide better tension. You could wet the lace, stretch it on & tie it, so when it drys it’ll shrink slightly. Just a thought.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Andre's profile

Andre

4853 posts in 3098 days


#4 posted 12-29-2020 08:30 PM

Kinda looks like ya may of had a drink or two LOL! Sorta like my fret saw cutting attempts. What no Video?
The Gramercy kit at Lee Valley is $90.00 so think I may just stick with the Knew saw which wasn’t much more back when I bought it, kind of scary how the price of tools has gone up in the last few years?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8849 posts in 1874 days


#5 posted 12-29-2020 08:53 PM

Tom, I think the nylon will be fine, I just have to have it tighter when I tie it.

Andre, I’ve already invested in the blades, and have a lathe to turn my own knobs, so I only need the $19 pair of pins. But that’s still more than a cheap coping saw at the hardware store. I may think about how to make one with all wooden parts (except the blade), but not today.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

737 posts in 2326 days


#6 posted 12-29-2020 09:34 PM

Washer & a Brass rod with a couple of saw cuts in it should work fine for the pins.
90 degree cut from the end for the saw blade to go in, 45 degree from the edge to hold the pin.
Couple of cuts to grip the epoxy on the handle side, washer to stop the handles binding with the frame.

I may be planning to make one :)

Hadn’t thought of all wood, maybe incorporate the blade holder in the handle to give enough support so the blade pins don’t split through the wood. Or just a very hard wood for the pins perhaps.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8849 posts in 1874 days


#7 posted 12-29-2020 10:21 PM

Yeah, Mike. Not too complicated. The nice thing about the Gramercy pins is that they have a built in 1/2” washer to spread the load, and are ribbed where they go into the handle so the epoxy can grip better.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View mafe's profile

mafe

13405 posts in 4381 days


#8 posted 12-29-2020 11:44 PM

Looks like a winner, nice work Dave.

MikeB:UK: I made the hardware for this one, some years back, you can see in my blog here, how I did it.

Hardware: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/32161
saw: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/32147

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8849 posts in 1874 days


#9 posted 12-30-2020 02:29 AM

Thanks, Mads! And thanks to the links on your saw. I think I have seen it before.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

737 posts in 2326 days


#10 posted 12-30-2020 09:03 AM

Cheers Mads
Nice swans :)

Pretty much where I was going with it, but with an angle to the cross cut. Thought it would slip if it was straight?

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13405 posts in 4381 days


#11 posted 12-30-2020 10:51 AM

Dave, yes it is some years ago by now, I were inspired by a guy who had cut swans into his saw, usually I don’t do ornamentation, but I had to try if I could do some, just for the challenge.

Mike, the cuts are at an angle, just not as steep, it works fine, but you can make them a wee more if you feel safer. They have never slipped, remember they are under tension. You could also make a small hook / groove by drilling a hole first and then go offset straight into the rod… Just be careful not to go too deep, so it becomes fragile.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8849 posts in 1874 days


#12 posted 12-30-2020 11:46 AM

Mads, I understand about the ornamentation. That’s why I’m playing with kolrosing on this saw. To see if I can.

Mike, as Mads says, the angle doesn’t need to be that steep. If there’s no tension, the angle helps hold the blade, but only a small amount. If there’s any tension at all, the blade is locked in pretty well.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1669 posts in 1415 days


#13 posted 12-30-2020 03:59 PM

Great saw Dave.
Its very cool to make your own tools.
Nice work!

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

737 posts in 2326 days


#14 posted 12-30-2020 05:06 PM


Mike, the cuts are at an angle, just not as steep, it works fine, but you can make them a wee more if you feel safer. They have never slipped, remember they are under tension. You could also make a small hook / groove by drilling a hole first and then go offset straight into the rod… Just be careful not to go too deep, so it becomes fragile.

- mafe


Mike, as Mads says, the angle doesn’t need to be that steep. If there’s no tension, the angle helps hold the blade, but only a small amount. If there’s any tension at all, the blade is locked in pretty well.

- Dave Polaschek

Cool, cheers both

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8849 posts in 1874 days


#15 posted 12-30-2020 06:38 PM

Thanks, MrWolfe!

Cheers, Mike.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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