LumberJocks

Forge table #2: Roughing out the legs

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Blog entry by Dave Polaschek posted 10-05-2020 06:44 PM 392 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Oak top Part 2 of Forge table series Part 3: Cleaning up the top »

Today was (the first) leg day. I started with a 5 foot long piece of 8/4 ash that was about 7 inches wide.

First up was getting a square edge or two to work from, so I started by planing the straighter of the two narrow edges down using my #7 jointer. It doesn’t get a lot of use, but it’s sure handy for making things flat.

Using that edge as a reference, I cut the end of the board square (it wasn’t).

And then I measured 40 inches from that end, and struck another line across. I’m not sure if the legs will be the full 40 inches long, but that felt like a good height when I was playing around with things. There’s a knot or two in the board that might convince me to make the legs 35 or 36 inches long, though.

With that done, I measured the width and planed the side opposite my reference face flat with the jointer, then I marked three lines dividing the board roughly into quarters. These would be just a bit under 1¾ inches wide, so with the 2 inch thick board, they’ll be pretty close to square.

Some ripping and planing later (I used the circular saw to rip, but the blade won’t quite cut all the way through the 2 inch thick board, so I had to finish with a handsaw), I had four roughly square and fairly straight pieces of ash which will become the legs for my table,

-- Dave - Santa Fe



11 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3084 posts in 3108 days


#1 posted 10-05-2020 07:01 PM

Looking good Dave.
Don’t forget, that No. 7, it’s really good when used with a shooting board to square end grain. Plenty of mass to cut through the grain.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

6239 posts in 1499 days


#2 posted 10-05-2020 07:35 PM

Thanks, Tom!

The #7 is long enough that it’s already run into the wall of the shop by the time I get it up to speed if I’m using it with the shoot board. But I’ve got a LN 51 that works quite nicely with either of the shoot boards I have. It’s almost as heavy as the 7, and quite a bit shorter.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4809 posts in 2539 days


#3 posted 10-05-2020 07:56 PM

Dave, my planer days went by the wayside when I left school 60 years ago. I do have a couple little planes that I use to make shavings for my wine boxes but to actually use one bring a board to shape – naw, not me. That’s what my table saw is for.
I envy anybody that can push one a get full blade cut – it’s not an easy task. Good on you for using old school – -

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

6239 posts in 1499 days


#4 posted 10-05-2020 08:14 PM

Dick, most of the work getting the board to shape was done with the saw. Saw a straight line, and there’s not much work to be done by the plane. ;-)

With the #7, I almost never will get a full width cut. Usually one side of the board is a little higher than the other. And I almost never get a full-length cut, because when I do, I’m done! Mostly I’m sliding it back and forth, knocking off a few high spots.

Once the high spots are gone, I move on to other tools. And if the high spots are too high, I’ll take them off crosswise with a scrub plane, which will get about ⅛ inch deep, but only about a half to ¾ inch wide.

Question at this point is what shape the legs are going to be. I’m thinking I might make a detour and build a bungee-cord lathe and turn them round, but then again, I might decide to plane them octagonal tomorrow and be done. Busy in the kitchen making ragout this afternoon, so it’s a decision to defer. But I did order a skew and a spindle gouge first when I decide it’s time to turn stuff.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

4378 posts in 2241 days


#5 posted 10-05-2020 09:14 PM

Wow Dave, your forge table is going going to be a lot fancier than I did for mine. My table height was determined by my leg vise and ended up at 28 1/4. With the legs of my forge raising it up higher than that, it is a comfortable height for me, but we have different styles of forge, mine being open on the front. I did put a plate of 3/16 steel under the forge to dissipate the heat.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

6239 posts in 1499 days


#6 posted 10-05-2020 09:46 PM

Mine’s open on the front too, Duck.

It’s the Hells Forge single.

But it’ll sit pretty high. My goal was to have it high enough that I don’t have to bend down too much to see the color of the piece of metal I’m heating, and also high enough that if I put a pipe of oil on my low bench (which is 20½ inches off the ground), it’s a downhill run from the forge to the oil. If I have to lift and then put the knife blank into the oil, I risk knocking the oil over.

I like the idea of a piece of plate to set the forge on. Might steal that idea.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

4378 posts in 2241 days


#7 posted 10-05-2020 10:39 PM

Ah Hah, I see. Mine is homemade and given to me. What I meant by open on the front is this:

This is from 2019 when I made the holdfast for PoohBaah. It also tilts back for limited access from both ends. Back then, I hadn’t built the table for it yet, used a washing machine metal tub and a barrel lid. At some point, I want to make some modifications to the forge to make it more useful.
And yes, the steel plate under it is a safety factor. Don’t have a picture of that.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View mikeacg's profile

mikeacg

1746 posts in 1974 days


#8 posted 10-05-2020 11:25 PM

Don’t make it too pretty Dave or someone might want to bring it into the house!

-- Mike, A Yooper with a drawl, http://www.artcentergraphics.com

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

6239 posts in 1499 days


#9 posted 10-06-2020 01:17 AM

Got it, Duck. Supposedly mine will be safe without a metal plate under it, but better safe than sorry, right?

Mike, it’ll be a shop table, even if I pretty it up Real Good. First one of anything, I get to keep as a practice piece of “shop furniture.” Plus, my sweetie doesn’t like having Too Much Stuff, so I’m encouraged to keep my crap in the shop.

Built the dead centers for my bungee-powered lathe today. Should get some black iron pipe and a few clamps next week. Guess I should start blogging that build, too.

Or just get back to building bookcases…

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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GR8HUNTER

8061 posts in 1629 days


#10 posted 10-06-2020 02:35 PM

is pooh still around ? have not heard him for long time

i hope you dont hate me now BUT i have never even picked up a plane in my whole life :<(((

this will be a GR8 TABLE Dave :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

6239 posts in 1499 days


#11 posted 10-06-2020 03:03 PM

Last I heard from Pooh, he was still busy with the farm.

I figure for pretty much everything, there’s more than one way to do it, Tony. I prefer quiet over loud most of the time, though.

My expectations for the table are kinda low, but I’m going to experiment a little. My hope is, even with building the lathe and learning to turn legs, I’ll be using the table for the knife swap, so I can’t get too fancy. But who knows, I might find another distraction along the way.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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