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Handy tools #9: The truck kit

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Blog entry by Dave Polaschek posted 08-25-2019 01:43 PM 948 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: Knife making tools Part 9 of Handy tools series Part 10: Bowl horse »

After a few times going to the resort, or driving down the road and seeing a piece of tree that might be useful, I decided to set up a small kit of hand tools that I would keep in my pickup so I would always have them with me.

This week, I ended up putting that kit to the test, and added a few things to make it a nearly complete (if minimal) woodworking shop on wheels.

Here’s part of it:

From top to bottom: a hand screw, because work-holding is the most important thing with hand tools; a pencil; a Big Boy folding branch saw, which is handy for rough cross-cutting; one of the birch-bark handled carving knives I made, with the sheath from MaFe; and a fine (32tpi) gents saw, which is nice for finer cuts.

Not pictured (yet) are a block plane, a hatchet, and a knock-down frame saw.

I’m moving across the country, and the movers picked up the bulk of my stuff he other day, so I didn’t have a shop left. And then I noticed that there was a soft spot on the threshold of my side door. When I poked at it with the knife, there was some pretty serious rot. Apparently a boot-heel had chipped the paint at some point, letting water into the wood, and bad things happened.

So I used he folding saw to rough out a scrap of wood. Used the gents saw and knife to fine-tune it, and the knife to clean up the hole. Once I had a pretty good fit, I glued the patch into place and “clamped” it with a couple drywall screws. Split the patch, because I hadn’t drilled a pilot hole, because I don’t have a drill (will add one soon). Filled the gaps with wood filler, then used the block plane to match the profiles.

Three coats of shellac (wiped on with a rag) later, it’s ready for paint. I’m happy I had a set of tools in the truck, and I feel better about being able to do useful work without a full shop. It’s not the best repair, but with a fresh coat of paint on it, it’ll at least keep the problem from getting any worse.

-- Dave - Santa Fe



12 comments so far

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

9480 posts in 2821 days


#1 posted 08-25-2019 02:41 PM

Dave, that’s what duct tape is for. Seriously, you did a good job with what you had. Being concerned not to leave it damaged shows you care.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5435 posts in 1360 days


#2 posted 08-25-2019 03:17 PM

Thanks, Dave. The house was built in 1929, so I feel responsible to keep it in good shape for the next owner. Heck, I had a contractor put all new stucco on it last year because 30 years ago, a previous owner had painted the stucco, trapping moisture in the house, and the metal lath that held up the stucco had rusted.

It’ll end up being a couple three hours total for this patch, but it’ll mean the difference between needing to replace the threshold in a year or two, vs. maybe twenty.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7200 posts in 2982 days


#3 posted 08-25-2019 09:26 PM

well I reckon that’s worth doing a mono in your new driveway to celebrate!

-- Regards Rob

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5435 posts in 1360 days


#4 posted 08-26-2019 01:00 AM

Thanks, Rob! I have no idea what you said, but I like it!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7200 posts in 2982 days


#5 posted 08-26-2019 04:34 AM

OK let me explain

1. Your motor bike has two wheels/ yes no?
2. start it up and pop the clutch, this should do one of two things,
2a flip the front wheel up and presto you have mono cycle, or
2b The whole activity results in you lying on the drive way with the machine on top of you, and just by chance this is not the result that was intended!
If you have achieved 2a then ride around on the back wheel celebrating! ... make sure the wife doesn’t spring you doing this as she may not see the fun your having as being the behavior of the sensible man she married.

When I was younger I had a Honda 90cc step through of which I loved doing this stunt and showing off whenever my mates came around!

However some 50 years on and I am now afraid that my BMW will just fall on me while I am just trying to move it, let alone even attempt to pull a mono on it!

https://www.wikihow.com/Do-a-Basic-Wheelie-on-a-Motorcycle

AKA a wheelie!

Have I told you about the donuts I used to do in my Ford Zephyr Mk II ? another youthful activity which usually resulted in ripping the side walls out of the retreads tires … alll I could afford in the day !

Lotta fun in those days …now you would get locked up for it

-- Regards Rob

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5435 posts in 1360 days


#6 posted 08-26-2019 10:28 AM

Ahh, mono = wheelie.

When I test-drove my BMW, I looked at the manual long enough to figure out how to shut off traction control. The bike could pull the front wheel off the pavement in all six gears with just application of the throttle (though you need to be going pretty fast to do so in sixth gear), which sold me on it.

Last wheelies I’ve done, over six years ago now.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5451 posts in 2165 days


#7 posted 08-26-2019 09:43 PM

Nicely done. I think you deserve to crack open a Hamms for all the hard work. Prost

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5435 posts in 1360 days


#8 posted 08-26-2019 10:00 PM

Thanks, Nathan. I did.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7200 posts in 2982 days


#9 posted 08-28-2019 10:30 PM

Make that another one handed mono with a Hamms in the other hand!

You need a break from all that stressful furniture hauling Dave!

Oh I wonder who else I can go and annoy now!??

-- Regards Rob

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1734 posts in 1888 days


#10 posted 09-02-2019 10:56 PM

Nice on Dave, resourceful.

-- There is no hope for any of us if we keep apologizing for telling the truth.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6583 posts in 2498 days


#11 posted 10-29-2019 11:59 AM

Did you ever add a drill or any more tools to your truck kit? I drive my truck typically only when I need to otherwise I’m in/on something that gets far better fuel mileage. I would like to put something in there not so much for impromptu repairs but more so for harvesting wood from piles left along the road if/when a tree is taken down.

My SV1000S was too good a wheelies, though it only surprised me unexpectedly once on an on ramp in 3rd gear which I didn’t think it would pull the front wheel with me still quite far forward on the tank, and it did. I saved it but my underwear wasn’t so lucky. My current Vulcan 2000 can spin the tire at will but at well over the 1/2 ton mark with me on it, a wheelie would be impossible, and that’s a good thing!

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5435 posts in 1360 days


#12 posted 10-29-2019 09:57 PM

I have a small Fiskars drill with whatever the right size bit for a pilot hole for a #8 wood screw is, plus a box of toothpicks in the kit now. Plus a dozen #8 screws of various lengths. So mine is definitely a repair kit now. The folding branch-trimming “BigBoy” saw is a darned handy thing, though.

With traction control on, my K1600 just takes away some throttle (or taps the rear brake) if the front wheel comes up. With me on it, there’s pretty close to a half-ton, and as I said, it can lift the front wheel in all six gears if I shut off the traction control. But it’s an in-line six.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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