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Silent Fiddle Build #9: Neck Work

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Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 06-08-2020 11:02 AM 267 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: Electronics Installation Part 9 of Silent Fiddle Build series Part 10: The nut and saddle »

With the finish dry, I glued the fingerboard onto the neck and clamped it.

But then the finish on the back of the neck needs to be scraped off, down to the wood. This is because the finish may become sticky with the heat and moisture of the player’s hand and can interfere with rapid playing.

And then I coat the bare wood with boiled linseed oil to protect it and keep it from getting toon stained by hands and sweat.

The only work left is the saddle, nut, and set up which I will do at my place of work.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



4 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5634 posts in 1385 days


#1 posted 06-08-2020 11:10 AM

Hmm. Interesting that here’s not a finish other than oil that won’t become sticky and slow down the neck. I would’ve thought a lacquer, perhaps.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1957 posts in 2991 days


#2 posted 06-08-2020 12:26 PM



Hmm. Interesting that here’s not a finish other than oil that won’t become sticky and slow down the neck. I would’ve thought a lacquer, perhaps.

- Dave Polaschek

I can’t speak for all violins. The student violins that I’ve worked on do have something like lacquer on them and I leave that alone, but when I’ve had to make a repair to a broken neck on a student rental this is what my boss told me to do.

That said, something like polurethane oil base would probably work just as well.

My co-worker, who repairs woodwinds, but knows guitars very well, goes on and on about how certain brands of guitars use oil, some lacquer. It’s evidently a matter of brand and opinion.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2985 posts in 2993 days


#3 posted 06-08-2020 04:02 PM

How about shellac? I thought most craftsman of ages gone by used shellac to rub on a high gloss finish, instruments as well as furniture, etc.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1957 posts in 2991 days


#4 posted 06-08-2020 09:38 PM



How about shellac? I thought most craftsman of ages gone by used shellac to rub on a high gloss finish, instruments as well as furniture, etc.

- Oldtool

The old masters used shelac. I’m sure the current masters do too. The particulars of that process seem to be one of the secrets they keep to themselves, or at least it’s not covered well in books. :-/

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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