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Silent Fiddle Build #5: Edge fluting

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Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 06-04-2020 08:56 PM 492 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Neck Mortise Part 5 of Silent Fiddle Build series Part 6: Electronics well »

In an attempt to make this fiddle look less blocky I am creating a cove or ‘fluding’ around the curved edges. This also helps mimick the overhand that is on traditional violins and will give sich accessories as a shoulder rest something to grab onto.

I’m doing this the hard way with rasps and files. It just seems the best way to me.

The white on the rims is chaulk. It made it easier to see the thickness of the rims so that I had a chance of making them even.

And then I finish up with sand paper and hope for the best.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



4 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3354 posts in 3483 days


#1 posted 06-04-2020 09:10 PM

I wouldn’t say that rasps & files are the hard way, should have been quiet relaxing work. How else would you do this? Maybe on a router table, but you would need a rather large router bit to make this cove. Even then, a slight slip and bingo – a large gouge out of the side.
Looking good, nice work, and I’m interested to see the final product. Going to be a very interesting shape.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8850 posts in 1874 days


#2 posted 06-04-2020 09:48 PM

I agree. Rasps and files seem like the easy way, though if I was feeling bold, I might take a gouge to it for the bulk of the material removal.

I wonder if a moulding plane could hog out the bulk of the material in a hurry. Could be!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2009 posts in 3480 days


#3 posted 06-04-2020 10:58 PM



I wouldn t say that rasps & files are the hard way, should have been quiet relaxing work. How else would you do this? Maybe on a router table, but you would need a rather large router bit to make this cove. Even then, a slight slip and bingo – a large gouge out of the side.
Looking good, nice work, and I m interested to see the final product. Going to be a very interesting shape.

- Oldtool

Truly what you say is correct. Rasping and filiung can be fun, and in this case I think it was the best way to go. I did try to think of something using a router, but it just seemed too risky from a quality of result poinbt of view. The tab on the top portion would also not be easy to route around.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2009 posts in 3480 days


#4 posted 06-04-2020 11:01 PM



I agree. Rasps and files seem like the easy way, though if I was feeling bold, I might take a gouge to it for the bulk of the material removal.

I wonder if a moulding plane could hog out the bulk of the material in a hurry. Could be!

- Dave Polaschek

I used a gouge when I made the neck for my wife’s cello. It was really the only way to hollow out an inside curve. I really need to leard how to sharpen gouges though. I’m not quite there.

I think a moulding plane would present the same challenge as using a router. Really not enough work to make it worth the ‘set up’.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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