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Building Teardrop No. 2 #1: Only a matter of time

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Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 04-25-2020 10:07 PM 803 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Building Teardrop No. 2 series Part 2: Shaping the end blocks »

I’ve gathered the parts for another teardrop fiddle. I adjusted the form down about 1/4 inch all around and am using some red oak and pine. Even though I already purchased them, I may try making my own tuning pegs on the lathe. For sure I want to put a purfling edge on the top and bottom this time.

First step is always gluing the end blocks onto the mold.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



16 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6637 posts in 1550 days


#1 posted 04-25-2020 11:47 PM

Hmm. Not sure about red oak, but we’ll see how it comes out. Looking forward to watching again.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2008 posts in 3156 days


#2 posted 04-26-2020 12:08 AM



Hmm. Not sure about red oak, but we’ll see how it comes out. Looking forward to watching again.

- Dave Polaschek

You mean because of the flexibility? Or the color?

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7653 posts in 3172 days


#3 posted 04-26-2020 12:57 AM

Red oak? looks like a big chunk of manky plywood to me!
and whats with all the chip out on the holes did you get your grandson to help out in the woodshop.

Teardrop fiddle? I hope it doesn’t bring tears to my eyes when I hear you play it

BTW did DMiller contact you about Dulcimers?

-- Regards Rob

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3632 posts in 4406 days


#4 posted 04-26-2020 02:05 AM

Is the form that is oak or will the instrument be made of oak? If it is oak for the instrument it will be very interesting to see what develops.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6637 posts in 1550 days


#5 posted 04-26-2020 02:49 AM

Red oak just isn’t what I think of for instruments, Dave. The pores give me fits if I don’t pore-fill, and even then it’s tough to get what I think of as an instrument-quality finish on it.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3632 posts in 4406 days


#6 posted 04-26-2020 05:31 AM



Red oak? looks like a big chunk of manky plywood to me!
and whats with all the chip out on the holes did you get your grandson to help out in the woodshop.

Teardrop fiddle? I hope it doesn t bring tears to my eyes when I hear you play it

BTW did DMiller contact you about Dulcimers?

- robscastle

What’s with the comment? This guy does some fine work. Check out is previous stuff.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2008 posts in 3156 days


#7 posted 04-26-2020 11:20 AM



Is the form that is oak or will the instrument be made of oak? If it is oak for the instrument it will be very interesting to see what develops.

- Craftsman on the lake

The back and sides will be oak. The top is to be pine, like my previous teardrop fiddle. The mold in the photo above is straight plywood.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2008 posts in 3156 days


#8 posted 04-26-2020 11:21 AM



Red oak just isn’t what I think of for instruments, Dave. The pores give me fits if I don’t pore-fill, and even then it’s tough to get what I think of as an instrument-quality finish on it.

- Dave Polaschek

Is that true of oak generally? My box cello is white oak and I think the finish on it came out quite nice.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2008 posts in 3156 days


#9 posted 04-26-2020 11:28 AM



Red oak? looks like a big chunk of manky plywood to me!
and whats with all the chip out on the holes did you get your grandson to help out in the woodshop.

Teardrop fiddle? I hope it doesn t bring tears to my eyes when I hear you play it

BTW did DMiller contact you about Dulcimers?

- robscastle

A little harsh with the humor there, Rob. I’m pretty sure you know that the photo shows the mold on which the ribs are formed for the instrument and not the instrument itself. The mold is made of plywood as you deduced and does not need to be anything particularly fancy.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2008 posts in 3156 days


#10 posted 04-26-2020 12:01 PM


Red oak? looks like a big chunk of manky plywood to me!
and whats with all the chip out on the holes did you get your grandson to help out in the woodshop.

Teardrop fiddle? I hope it doesn t bring tears to my eyes when I hear you play it

BTW did DMiller contact you about Dulcimers?

- robscastle

What s with the comment? This guy does some fine work. Check out is previous stuff.

- Craftsman on the lake

Thank you for the compliment!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6637 posts in 1550 days


#11 posted 04-26-2020 01:08 PM



Is that true of oak generally? My box cello is white oak and I think the finish on it came out quite nice.

White oak has tyloses filling many pores, which makes it easier to finish, and the difference between hardness in the rings seems to be less pronounced than in red oak, at least to me.

I think you’ll probably do fine with it, but I’ve had enough problems with red oak (mostly clusters of pores that make for a soft spot in the wood) that I mostly relegate it to things like legs for shop furniture.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7653 posts in 3172 days


#12 posted 04-26-2020 09:13 PM

Yes in fact he does do fine work, hence the recommendation to talk structural aspects of Dulcimers with DMiller.

Sometimes my weird sense of humour gets me into trouble like now, so apologies to those offended.

I will follow with interest the progression without the rye humour.

-- Regards Rob

View pel004's profile

pel004

19 posts in 1181 days


#13 posted 04-28-2020 09:47 AM

Hi, Dave. What wood did you use for the neck, finger board and tail piece? I find ebony works well for these but is extremely messy until finished. They take a good work out without a lot of stress. I love your work.

Also, what do you use for the finish on your instruments? I just completed a violin but having it tested now. If it doesn’t play it’ll make good kindle for my spring fire pit! Then try again…so I’m hopeful.

-- PEL004

View pel004's profile

pel004

19 posts in 1181 days


#14 posted 04-28-2020 09:54 AM

By the way, I found a cool tool for the purfling perimeters for my Dremel. So much cleaner without a lot of finish work once inlaid. There’s a lot to be said of the cutting tool and chip tool for the purflings for the knowledge of inlays and tool mastery but once I tried this tool, it’s hard to go back to the old process.

-- PEL004

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

2008 posts in 3156 days


#15 posted 04-28-2020 11:12 AM



Hi, Dave. What wood did you use for the neck, finger board and tail piece? I find ebony works well for these but is extremely messy until finished. They take a good work out without a lot of stress. I love your work.

Also, what do you use for the finish on your instruments? I just completed a violin but having it tested now. If it doesn t play it ll make good kindle for my spring fire pit! Then try again…so I m hopeful.

- pel004

Ah, now my facade of craftsmanship falls! I purchased the neck, pegs, and tailpiece. I am only making the body of the instrument here. While I have made at least one violin fingerboard, and one tailpiece (from mahogany) I wanted to concentrate on the body of the instrument here. For me these are part of a self education process and I don’t want to lose my momentum by having to learn every required skill at once.

That said, I’ve been finishing these instruments with wood stain and spray lacquer.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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