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Making parts #2: Next step =half way on "nibs"

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Blog entry by Dan Krager posted 02-13-2020 09:41 PM 474 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Liberty Bell nib Part 2 of Making parts series no next part

The flats on the “nibs” (for lack of a better term) are done on one end. I didn’t show the whole index setup. Had I allowed more material per part, I think I could have cut the flats on the other end, but being stingy here didn’t pay off. I’ll have to do another setup. It will probably work out better because the uncut web between the flats is only 0.075” thick and not strong enough to support the opposing cut. So I’m inside getting warm while I think up another setup. Temp has dropped close to 10° in a short time today.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.



18 comments so far

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

10851 posts in 2471 days


#1 posted 02-14-2020 05:29 AM

Dan, I am not familiar with Liberty Bell planes. What is the purpose of this ‘nib’?

-- God bless, Candy

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4590 posts in 4366 days


#2 posted 02-14-2020 01:34 PM

Candy, and others:

The “nib” is a really unusual part of a Liberty Bell plane. It sits next to the short bolt holding the cutter and chipbreaker together. It engages with a corresponding slot in the cutter height adjustment lever.

This part is frequently missing, due to mishandling over the years, sharpening, etc, and although their role in the use of these Stanley Liberty planes is critical, you can sorta get by without the nib. This is why Liberty Bell planes often have a cutter that’s been beat to death with a hammer, with users trying to adjust blade height without being able to use the lever.

Dan has been a real sport about machining a handful of these, I’ve got at least four planes lacking this critical little part.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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poopiekat

4590 posts in 4366 days


#3 posted 02-14-2020 01:45 PM

Candy, here’s a view of the piece, as it sits in the cutter assembly, and how it registers in the body of a Stanley Liberty Bell plane.

I have a restored #135 which sees a fair bit of action in my shop. Liberty Bell planes were produced both as Transitional, and all-metal versions. I finally got a whole set together!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12210 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 02-14-2020 09:31 PM

Can you use a jack to support the cantilevered part while you mill it Dan? Also, mill towards the indexer to direct the lateral force that way.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

10851 posts in 2471 days


#5 posted 02-14-2020 11:14 PM

Thanks for the info PK. I had no clue.
Kenny, took me a few seconds to understand you weren’t proposing a new use for a No. 5 plane. :-P

-- God bless, Candy

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4502 posts in 2866 days


#6 posted 02-15-2020 02:38 AM

HK, I have taken another path since I cut the material shorter than I needed before I realized I needed it! Six of the nibs are done and then my motor died. The brushes were worn down too short and in the process of tear down I found a broken fan. So nothing major (yet) but a delay in getting parts.

Thanks for the idea which will be remembered for the next need. Maybe I need to make a tiny jack. So many little gadgets can be made when one has the “maker”.

While we’re on ideas, how to make the nuts? The closest match I could find is metric, no metric nuts of that size are available. The OD won’t be close if I did find them. This nut is really odd. When over half the threads are missing due to the flats, the fit has to be very close. I used a metric die for the nibs and have the mating tap, so my plan is to buy the next larger hex rod and mill the six flats to match the nut. Then I can drill and tap it to match the nibs and start slicing off the thin nuts. Any better ideas?

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4590 posts in 4366 days


#7 posted 02-15-2020 04:14 AM

Hi Dan!
Hope I didn’t lead you straight into a Pandora’s box of unforeseen trouble! The actual thread size is not really relevant, as long as it does the job! Since a nib doesn’t have to mate with the proprietary threaded holes on a Stanley plane, nobody will ever notice.

I appreciate all your time and effort, Dan!!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#8 posted 02-15-2020 05:10 AM

Wow, good stuff Dan.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12210 posts in 1770 days


#9 posted 02-15-2020 03:41 PM

You can’t get hex stock that’s already the required size Dan? Buying hex stock and milling it to a smaller hex seems like a pain. But, ya do what you gotta!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4502 posts in 2866 days


#10 posted 02-15-2020 04:31 PM

HK, maybe I can order a size that will work, but can’t find it in stores local. As PK noted, these parts are a system unto themselves and they don’t have to meet any particular standard. I.E. they are bastard parts and by GAWD I’m gonna keep them that way! LOL! What fun. It’s really pretty easy when you have a tolerance problem… It seems obvious I’m competing with hand made parts that never saw a machine and any consistency that we find was a testament to the skill of the makers.

Here’s a pic of the 5 finished nibs next to the blanks prepared for the last milling cuts and the setup.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4590 posts in 4366 days


#11 posted 02-15-2020 08:20 PM

Well, I never thought that this ‘nib’ thing would explode into the conflagration that it has become!
Dan, your enthusiasm is matched by your machining talents. I am humbled.

I’m frankly shocked at the engineers’ ham fisted approach to plane design, but I gotta remember that this was 1876, in the infancy of the Stanley Tool and Level Co.

Now… does anybody else need a ‘nib’ for their Stanley Liberty Bell planes?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12210 posts in 1770 days


#12 posted 02-15-2020 10:57 PM

What kind of setup do you have there Dan? Is that a Smithy? Looks to be a combo machine of some ilk?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4502 posts in 2866 days


#13 posted 02-15-2020 11:28 PM

Yes, it’s a Smithy Granite 1324, came as you see it all the way to the floor. I’m the third owner, and in 2012 the machine got dropped on it’s head by the “new” second owner who mishandled it while unloading it at home. It has lifting bars… DOH! They got it repaired quite well I think and I haven’t had any issues relating to that. They told me about it to their credit. It seems quite accurate and has done everything I’ve asked it to do so far. Had the price of a new machine worth of tooling with it. This is the first issue I’ve had where it didn’t run. It wasn’t well cared for by previous owner, so it was filthy, un-lubricated, and had strange noises coming from places that should not be making strange noises. The current remaining noise is the drawbar I made to replace the default wrench requirement slightly rubs the belt cover on top, easily cured when I get tired of it. The fan is actually easily glued back together, but I’m gonna shoot for a new one. Motor brushes are common in farm country…if needed.

It fulfills a long time dream to have one. One does not find deals like this very often.

BTW, if you can use an expensive new tool to repair or build something (even insignificant) for the SO you get LOTS of bonus points.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12210 posts in 1770 days


#14 posted 02-16-2020 03:29 AM

That’s a nice setup Dan. I’ve always liked the look of those Smithys but never had my hands on one. Having the ability to turn and mill metal definitely takes your shop up a level. Congrats on a great acquisition and on putting it to work so quickly :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4502 posts in 2866 days


#15 posted 02-17-2020 04:18 PM

OK. Smithy came through. Parts are on their way except the fan, so repair of that is the order of the day.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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