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Building A Cuttaway Acoustic Guitar #4: Part 4: Rosette, Bracing and Gluing the Top

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Blog entry by DMiller posted 09-10-2019 10:23 PM 772 reads 2 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Part 3: Kerfing, Bracing, and Gluing the Back Part 4 of Building A Cuttaway Acoustic Guitar series no next part

Well folks, its been a while! I am now in my senior year of high school and unfortunately, time is not slowing down! I haven’t had a lot of time to work on the guitar this past summer, but I really have enjoyed the time I have had. Looking back at my last blog makes me feel like since my last post not a lot has happened; in reality I feel like I understand how to build a guitar and the order everything is assembled much better. The rosette has taken just about the most time creating- between getting my segment blocks correctly assembled and doing a practice rosette instillation.

Here is what the guitar currently looks like!

Beginning to make the rosette brick- I found accuracy in the angles was my biggest problem.

The rosette block is then cut into thin slivers to be inserted into the spruce soundboard. Each sliver was inserted using a scalpel blade; each one took about 15-20 minutes to completely install.

Being that I plan to finish the guitar using the method of french polishing, I decided to give my practice rosette a try at it as practice.

Real soundboard after rosette is installed; this is the soundboard that is going on the guitar.

To level the rosette, I used some cardstock with the rosette shape cutout to protect the spruce. I then used my orbital sander and leveled the rosette- I think in went through two pieces of cardstock. I learned from the practice soundboard that the sander eats the spruce away faster than the rosette, leaving an unlevel soundboard.

Next, I installed the bracing. I am using the popular X-bracing method, which uses a main X brace in the center.

The soundboard bridge support was installed next. Its purpose is to reinforce the soundboard where the major string force is applied; the bridge will be directly on top of it.

Somehow due to summer heat, air humidity, and dryness, much to my dismay, my guitar back cracked. I talked with a local professional luthier and his suggestion was to insert small pieces of mahogany and try to fill the crack. He stated that the cracks would not decrease the guitars tone. Hopefully it will just be a repairable cosmetic problem. Here is a picture after the cracks were filled.

My next step was to create a name tag that will make this guitar specific to me. Using a business card designer, I was able to create my soundhole label and print it on cardstock. I then sprayed it with shellac to give it a bit of a sheen.

At this time the soundboard was sealed with a coat of shellac. The entire interior of the guitar is now sealed with shellac.

Gluing the soundboard to the body:

Following the soundboard being glued I flush routed the top to fit the body. This is what the guitar currently looks like.

Well that’s just about it! I am currently working on making the neck and getting all that accurately set up. If any of you have any suggestions of where to get guitar binding router bits for cheaper that LMI or Stewmac, or even any other methods, I would really appreciate some input. My apologies that these pictures are sideways.
Any comments or questions are certainly welcome!
-Dale Miller

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."



5 comments so far

View sras's profile

sras

5155 posts in 3610 days


#1 posted 09-10-2019 11:46 PM

You’re making good progress!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

495 posts in 953 days


#2 posted 09-11-2019 03:49 AM



You re making good progress!

- sras


Thanks Steve!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

View PPK's profile

PPK

1504 posts in 1290 days


#3 posted 09-11-2019 12:10 PM

Way to go, Dale! Problems like cracks happen, and it’s the ability to overcome and fix them that makes you a skilled craftsman. It’s looking really nice. I like the look of the rosette a lot. Is the rosette block made from plywood? (the outer layer of it that’s dark/light contrasting)

-- Pete

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

495 posts in 953 days


#4 posted 09-11-2019 01:44 PM



Way to go, Dale! Problems like cracks happen, and it s the ability to overcome and fix them that makes you a skilled craftsman. It s looking really nice. I like the look of the rosette a lot. Is the rosette block made from plywood? (the outer layer of it that s dark/light contrasting)

- PPK


Thanks Pete!
Technically speaking, the rosetted is a form of “plywood.” The main center of the rosette is honey locust burl, with maple-walnut-maple-walnut veneer sandwiched together. Hope this answers your question!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

View PPK's profile

PPK

1504 posts in 1290 days


#5 posted 09-12-2019 01:15 PM

That answers it perfectly, Dale. Keep on building…

-- Pete

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