LumberJocks

The Restoration of a 14" Tenon Saw #2: Cleaning the Saw Plate

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Blog entry by Brit posted 11-06-2011 11:40 PM 14329 reads 14 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Identification, Historical Evidence and a Vivid Imagination Part 2 of The Restoration of a 14" Tenon Saw series Part 3: Restoring the Saw Handle »

This saw plate is remarkably well preserved for its age, but it could benefit from a clean. I gathered the stuff I thought I might need, but all I used was the 3-IN-ONE degreaser foam, the Hammerite Rust Removal Gel, the green scouring pad, kitchen roll, and wet and dry paper (more than you see in the picture below).

I start by spraying the plate with the degreaser. I have found that the rust remover works better on the first application if the surface has been degreased first.

Wait 5 minutes…

Wipe the surface with kitchen roll. Then repeat for the other side.

Apply the Hammerite Rust Removal gel liberally.

After 20 minutes I dip the green scouring pad in water…

…and gently rub along the length of the plate. The black staining and any rust comes off in no time at all.

Then I washed the surface with a paper towel dipped in clean water and repeated the process on the other side of the saw plate.

With the rust and grime removed, it was time to start polishing the plate with wet & dry paper used dry. I went through the grits using long strokes along the plate. The grits used were P120, P180, P240, P320, P400, P600 and finally P800. I used a wooden block with the P120 and P180 grits. The other grits were used without the block. This was the result.

I like a shiny saw plate on my back saws. I use the reflection in the plate to line up my saw cuts so that I know when I’m cutting at 90 degrees and 45 degrees without having to mark the wood.

I might polish this a little bit more, but my arms were aching so I called it a day for the time being.

In Part 3, I turn my attention to the saw handle.

Thanks for watching.

-- Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."



21 comments so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

20057 posts in 3654 days


#1 posted 11-07-2011 12:43 AM

look, i can see myself. Nice.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1304 posts in 3976 days


#2 posted 11-07-2011 01:35 AM

Nice job! Can’t wait to see the wood restore.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 3867 days


#3 posted 11-07-2011 02:24 AM

And a “non pareil” saw as on top of the shine.. well done !
A bit of Brit history preserved ..

;-)}

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View ShopTinker's profile

ShopTinker

884 posts in 3855 days


#4 posted 11-07-2011 05:27 AM

Very impressive restoration. I’ve never expected to see a saw that was reflective.

-- Dan - Valparaiso, Indiana, "A smart man changes his mind, a fool never does."

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4381 posts in 4038 days


#5 posted 11-07-2011 03:14 PM

Excellent job preserving such an important saw. Your technique works very well!

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View tsangell's profile

tsangell

216 posts in 3780 days


#6 posted 11-07-2011 04:12 PM

Awesome. I love an old tool.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 3741 days


#7 posted 11-07-2011 09:59 PM

Andy. should you ever feel the need to come to the states you can swing by my place and help my make some of my tools as shiny as yours.

I own a B&B so I could probably make it worth your while.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Brit's profile

Brit

8324 posts in 3929 days


#8 posted 11-07-2011 10:27 PM

Thanks for all the compliments guys. My arms and shoulder are killing me today after all that rubbing. This saw needed a lot of work on the back side because there were two areas that were lower than the rest of the plate. I had to effectively take the rest of the plate down to that level whilst keeping it flat and an even thickness. You can just see the areas in question in the following photo. There’s a name for this phenomenum, but it escapes me now.

-- Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."

View Brit's profile

Brit

8324 posts in 3929 days


#9 posted 11-07-2011 10:28 PM

Ryan – That’s a tempting offer, if I ever escape from Denmark. :-)

-- Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 4890 days


#10 posted 11-08-2011 01:43 AM

That is really first-rate work. I will have to figure out what a North American match for the Hammerite is, but the degreaser is a very good idea.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3372 posts in 3741 days


#11 posted 11-08-2011 05:49 AM

Naval Jelly is the US version.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View mafe's profile

mafe

13189 posts in 4176 days


#12 posted 11-08-2011 02:49 PM

Escape from Denmark? Laugh.
Andy you are the master! I am always impressed to see what results you come up with, it is probably more shiny than when it was sold out the maker a long time ago.
What really bothers me is to see how much more effective the rust remover is at your place… It might be the degrease phase, since for me it is much more pitted and uneven after this remover.
Glad to see you are working on that sexy bench of yours again, but a little sad that you have upgrated the surface now… perhaps you could follow one of the cuttingboard blogs and make a really sexy top! Smiles.
Andy yóu are the master of rust removal, no doubt! Impressive work you have done.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View Brit's profile

Brit

8324 posts in 3929 days


#13 posted 11-08-2011 08:56 PM

Mads – It can’t be more pitted afterwards, its only rust remover and I take you mean uneven in colour, not that the surface is uneven. Next time I visit, bring out your worst rust and I’ll give you a demo.

By the way, good idea to upgrade the workmate top with a cutting board. I’ll get to work on my Sketchup design. It shouldn’t take more than a week to come up with something. I think I need some dark wood and some light wood. I’ll cut up both pieces then glue them back together in a different order. Tricky, but I think my skills are up to it now. ;-)

If anyone other than Mads is reading this, the previous paragraph is a private joke between me and Mads. Don’t ask.

-- Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."

View mafe's profile

mafe

13189 posts in 4176 days


#14 posted 11-09-2011 01:35 AM

And I just almost hit the ground from my chair while laughing!

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View TelescopeMaker's profile

TelescopeMaker

105 posts in 4107 days


#15 posted 04-02-2021 12:34 PM

Okay, this is nearly 10 years old, but it is exactly what I have been looking for. I don’t know why I did all that googling last night, and found what I was looking for right here on Lumberjocks.

Thanks a lot for this.

I actually started coming to hand tools more and more in the last 5 years. But with Covid-19, I had to pretty much stop powered tools. The last thing I wanted was to risk being in the hospital with a lopped off hand and get the ‘rona.

So the other day we got our first vaccination, and we had to travel far to do that – two hours to the north Georgia mountains. It was a beautiful spring day here, and the first time I’d been that far from the house in a year. And since we were up where all the good antique stores are, we made a day of it. I walked away with a round carvers mallet, a wide and serviceable wooden skew plane, and a large and heavy carcass saw – rip.

The mallet was brand new – still coated with beeswax. But for $8, compared to the $80 at Woodcraft, it was a steal, and I didn’t have to waste time making my own. The skew plan is wide enough that I will likely be able to add an adjustable fence to it.

But the carcass saw needs work. It is discolored, and not bright at all. There is going to be some pitting, I am sure. But like you, I like to have my saws shiny, so that I can use the reflection to aid cutting. And even if I get this thing shiny, I was wondering how to get the stains out.

I’m talking about the black stains that are left over after you get the red rust stains off. Maybe this will do the job? I sure hope so.

-- Telescope Maker, Woodworker, Brewer, Gizmologist, Gardner, Lawn Mower

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