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Arts and Crafts Dresser #5: Finishing Carcass and Fitting Drawer faces

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Blog entry by BlueRidgeDog posted 02-10-2019 04:52 PM 460 reads 1 time favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Arch, Carcass Glue-up and Top Part 5 of Arts and Crafts Dresser series Part 6: Top and waiting »

Not as much progress as desired this week, but fun non-the-less. Drawer Webs and Kickers are done and drawer fronts are fitted.

Side drawer runners are simply edge glued. Non-structural and just scrap oak. Carcass is done with the exception of the back, but that will go on last so I can reach as needed for drawer fitting.

Before fitting the first vertical edge:

The drawer faces are first cut to approximate height plus 1/16” then planed to fit the opening. Then they are butted against the side then hand planed to fit. In this example, I started working the bottom corner.

After fitting:

After planing the gap is closed. The face is then held against the center Drawer Support and marked.

Once marked it is cut close to the line then finished with a plane.

Each opening is a targeted size and each corner is intended to be 90 degrees, but subtle variations mean each face has to be fitted as they will be the basis for the drawer and the drawer must be sized for a piston fit to work without runners. At this point each face is friction fit on all four sides to the opening. They will be planed down again after the drawer is complete.

I also started scraping in the top.

The top and a few of the drawer faces have knots that need filling, but I will fill them after they are stained.

Time to start making drawers!



3 comments so far

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

170 posts in 50 days


#1 posted 02-10-2019 05:08 PM

I will add that drawer face fitting is a very iterative process. Offer it to the opening, note where it is tight, six or so strokes with the plane, repeat. Often up to ten times. Often this is accompanied with mumbling to myself “Okay, one full stroke on the top and three on the top left”. There is a a lot of end grain work and it required two pauses to resharpen. If anyone knows a better method, I am all for it. In the end they are gapless and deal with minute variations in the drawer webs.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2326 posts in 2619 days


#2 posted 02-11-2019 12:01 PM

Seems like the final details that no one notices are the ones that take the longest. Of course, if you don’t spend the time to get them just right they look bad and everyone notices them.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

170 posts in 50 days


#3 posted 02-11-2019 12:47 PM



Seems like the final details that no one notices are the ones that take the longest. Of course, if you don t spend the time to get them just right they look bad and everyone notices them.

- EarlS

I also think it is what gave way to the use of drawer slides and drawer facia boards. Just put a slide on it and shoot for an overlay drawer face. I don’t mind that look in a cabinet in my bathroom or kitchen, but have a hard time building furniture with it. Not saying I won’t in the future if the needs merit it.

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