LumberJocks

Model A 1930's Roadster

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Blog entry by AussieLarks posted 09-27-2021 04:25 AM 697 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The body is Jarrah a tough cranky wood from Western Australia the fenders and running board is American Cherry. Lovely to work with and reminds me of Maple. The seats and back are Jarrah too. The chassis is Tasmanian Blackwood which I would not use again for something so delicate. It broke when I attempted to make the front axle piece. In the end I swapped that small component (2) and rebuilt it using Cherry.
So in these early photos you can see I’ve managed to make some other components. The front fenders and the rear ones too.
Now the new steering column is made along with the new steering wheel and connected to the front sub frame. The only bit of the new parts glued in is the front fenders. The rest are dry fitted for now. How cute is the bonnet and engine covers. Very pleased with the work in that and happy with the rear fenders too.

Well I’ve had a few false dawns with this blog and the model. On a roll aye…..
PJonesy across the ditch in NZ save me from a major fo pa in relation to the front guards. The error is evident in the last photo above. Not sufficient space between the bonnet and guards.

Some reworking and the day was saved. The last week has seen headlights and the small side mounted lights made and fitted. Plus all the handles and the horn.
Having made the hood (in down mode) some weeks ago I felt encouraged to try to ebonise the wood (Jarrah) for the first time. I used double strength vinegar, (Supermarket) Fine 00-0 steel wool (Bunnings, Timbecon or Carbatec) three small pieces of Tassie Blackwood for the tannin it contains. All in an old jam jar and the lid on loosely (you may get gas) and left for 7 days. Because the hood is tiny I simply popped it in the brew for 12 hrs end for ending it after about 4-5 hours so it soaked completely.
Very happy with the result, delighted in fact.

This model has challenge me no end but the first one is the hardest. Some of Dan Gatto’s terminology is not what I’m used to in plans but with help from Jocks and in particular PJonesy we got there. All in all I’m pretty pleased with myself. I’d estimate it’s taken roughly 85 – 90 hrs. It has been most enjoyable and a nice way to pass what has been lockdown #6 here in Melbourne
Thanks for the help folks…

-- Kerry, Melbourne Australia



4 comments so far

View crowie's profile

crowie

5114 posts in 3239 days


#1 posted 09-27-2021 05:19 AM

Love the timber contrasts Kerry…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

8255 posts in 2109 days


#2 posted 09-28-2021 12:38 AM

Nut sure what you used for the steering wheel, however, this may be of benefit for the next build.

Dutchy introduced the concept of wooden buttons for steering wheels. I haven’t made a model for quite a while but maybe crowie has embraced the idea and could share more light on the subject.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

8255 posts in 2109 days


#3 posted 09-28-2021 12:43 AM

Also small wood beads (if you can find them) make great gearstick knobs.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

5114 posts in 3239 days


#4 posted 09-28-2021 09:52 AM

Yes Kerry as Alex said, I’ve used buttons for steering wheels.
Dutchy helped me source some larger ones as I couldn’t find any back a few years.

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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