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Stickley Quadralinear Leg

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Blog entry by 489tad posted 06-21-2020 11:32 PM 624 reads 5 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch


From a Robert W Lang’s More Shop Drawings For Craftsman Furniture, there is a section on how Stickley used the Quadralinear leg to achieve quartersawn on all four sides. I used it on my chair. The article states when stacking quartersawn on two sides and laminating the other two sides there was discoloring in the wood from staining or fuming. Stickley could easily machine this joint in his factory. Lang shows a process using the table saw. I followed the process on my Morris Chair and ottoman. Of course I had to divert from part of Lang’s process. The legs pieces are 2.5” wide by 1” thick. I made mine 1 1/16” thick. I first cut a 1/4” x 1/4” groove in their prospective locations.

Next unlike Lang’s, I held the piece on a jig to cut the 45 degree cuts. This is where the extra 1/16 comes in. On my test cuts at 1” thick there was some tear out on the edge. The extra material allows for planning down to square.



Once the cuts are precisely made there should be no gaps in the joints.


The joint was easy enough to make and it made a natural mortise that I used to attach the arm to the chair.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.



10 comments so far

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

11771 posts in 3250 days


#1 posted 06-22-2020 12:02 AM

Nicely done and illustrated Dan, thanks.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

945 posts in 922 days


#2 posted 06-22-2020 12:34 AM

Great post and thanks for sharing!
Jon

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3920 posts in 3050 days


#3 posted 06-22-2020 12:37 AM

Good information and an excellent fit!

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View wooded's profile

wooded

370 posts in 3071 days


#4 posted 06-22-2020 01:28 AM

Hi Dan …..This is Joe (wooded) I’m still getting your posts via email. This one is great with nice demo. Have started turning again a will be chiming in. Have missed the jocks a lot.

-- Joe in Pueblo West, Colo.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3771 posts in 3147 days


#5 posted 06-22-2020 01:54 PM

That is a slick trick that I’ll have to try to remember when I start making the various pieces of craftsman furniture for the house.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6171 posts in 3612 days


#6 posted 06-22-2020 07:15 PM

Wow, that’s impressive to do it the old school way. Looks like your angles came out spot-on.
I’ve made lots of posts like that, but always use a locking miter bit. Just one router bit with one setup makes it pretty easy to handle. Your method looks like there’s a few more steps, but the results are impressive.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14464 posts in 1937 days


#7 posted 06-24-2020 12:27 PM

Awesome Dan. Thanks for posting this. I’ve seen that type of leg and a sketch or two of how it’s done but your tutorial with pictures really brings it all together. Love the legs and love the chair!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14464 posts in 1937 days


#8 posted 06-24-2020 12:30 PM

I’m a little confused about the picture of the dial indicator on the right side of the fence though. Is that just being used as a micro-adjust or some other purpose?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View 489tad's profile

489tad

3856 posts in 3810 days


#9 posted 06-24-2020 01:25 PM



I m a little confused about the picture of the dial indicator on the right side of the fence though. Is that just being used as a micro-adjust or some other purpose?

- HokieKen

Kenny, yes that is my micro adjustment, ugly as it is. My fence is pretty close but if I need something dead on I can get it. It was very helpful cutting grooves and angles for the legs.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

View Northwest29's profile

Northwest29

1702 posts in 3289 days


#10 posted 06-25-2020 10:44 PM

A locking miter bit could also be used. HTH

-- Ron, "Curiosity is a terrible thing to waste."

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