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Forum topic by AlaskaGuy posted 01-18-2019 07:23 PM 815 views 1 time favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AlaskaGuy

5038 posts in 2573 days


01-18-2019 07:23 PM

I’m trying it find out what band saw blade tooth configuration I need/would be best.

I’ll be cutting curves in thick cherry stock. Stock will be from 4 to 6 inches thick. What I know so far is I’ll be using a 1/4 6 ppi. I don’t know which tooth pattern would be best. Standard, Skip Tooth, Variable or Hook. Look for smoothest cut for the least clean up of saw marks.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!


25 replies so far

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Craftsman on the lake

2856 posts in 3702 days


#1 posted 01-18-2019 07:42 PM

I’m not the expert you’re looking for but I’m glad you asked the question as I’ll be watching responses for awhile.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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HokieKen

8125 posts in 1403 days


#2 posted 01-18-2019 07:50 PM

I’m definitely no expert but I do have a little experience in cutting thick Cherry with a 1/4” blade. Not as thick as you’re using but 3-4”. I tried with a hook tooth and a skip tooth blade and found the skip tooth left a much smoother kerf. I believe the hook tooth is just too aggressive and Cherry a bit too soft to get as clean a cut. Those were just the 2 blades I had on hand at the time so they were what I tried. Can’t say whether a standard or variable pitch blade would provide any advantage.

I will be watching though to see what others say and what kind of results you get :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Rich

4079 posts in 854 days


#3 posted 01-18-2019 09:32 PM

Not an expert either, but if I were buying the blade, I’d go with a hook tooth given the thickness of the material. It will cut more aggressively and clear out the sawdust more efficiently. If you can find one in that TPI range with a variable pitch, that will reduce vibration.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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bigJohninvegas

567 posts in 1726 days


#4 posted 01-19-2019 01:26 AM

While I have never used a timber wolf blade. I Saw another, older post here that pointed out this web site for information.
https://timberwolfblades.com/
And if you google your question, you will come up with all sorts of web site with info like this one.
https://www.kmstools.com/blog/choosing-bandsaw-blades/

-- John

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MrRon

5351 posts in 3508 days


#5 posted 01-19-2019 03:21 AM

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2537 posts in 2109 days


#6 posted 01-19-2019 03:29 AM

As long as it’s not wet wood try a 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch carbide blade.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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Rich

4079 posts in 854 days


#7 posted 01-19-2019 04:12 AM


As long as it’s not wet wood try a 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch carbide blade.

- RobS888

The OP is cutting curves in thick cherry stock. Kind of hard to do that with a wide blade.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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knotscott

8204 posts in 3640 days


#8 posted 01-19-2019 04:30 AM

I just call Suffolk Machinery, tell them what I’m doing and what saw I have, and they’ll make a suggestion.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1983 posts in 2062 days


#9 posted 01-19-2019 04:59 AM

I have no clue this is not my wheel house.
But I do like skip tooth blades and always favorite any blade with a good weld.
Do let us know what works out to be the best.

-- Aj

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RobS888

2537 posts in 2109 days


#10 posted 01-19-2019 11:10 AM


As long as it’s not wet wood try a 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch carbide blade.

- RobS888

The OP is cutting curves in thick cherry stock. Kind of hard to do that with a wide blade.

- Rich


Good catch, I just rounded some huge cherry turning blanks that were 12×12 and 6 inches thick, so that was what I pictured.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1615 posts in 427 days


#11 posted 01-19-2019 01:54 PM

does anyone ever “tune” the back and sides of a blade ?
and check the weld area for defects and visually checking
for any factory blemishes, bends, kinks, etc.
after the new blade is on and adjusted accordingly, slowly ease a stone
to the back of the blade and each side behind the teeth to
dress down any irregularities. (I used to do it years ago, but not anymore).
[I learned that from Norm on his New Yankee Workshop show].
just a “shop tip” if you are going to do any intricate cuts or designs. (reduces sanding time).

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5201 posts in 2616 days


#12 posted 01-19-2019 02:42 PM

I’d go with the skip tooth and stone the back of the blade.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

5541 posts in 977 days


#13 posted 01-19-2019 04:24 PM

i will also follow along :<)))


does anyone ever “tune” the back and sides of a blade ?
and check the weld area for defects and visually checking
for any factory blemishes, bends, kinks, etc.
after the new blade is on and adjusted accordingly, slowly ease a stone
to the back of the blade and each side behind the teeth to
dress down any irregularities. (I used to do it years ago, but not anymore).
[I learned that from Norm on his New Yankee Workshop show].
just a “shop tip” if you are going to do any intricate cuts or designs. (reduces sanding time).

.

.

- John Smith


I must have forgotten that show or never seen it :<((((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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John Smith

1615 posts in 427 days


#14 posted 01-19-2019 05:08 PM

Tony – I think it was back in the early ‘90s for that show
or it could have been on TOH in his earlier years. (I forget).
I also forgot to mention that he said when dressing the back
and sides of the blade, to sort of take off the sharp back edges
like a router gently easing over a piece of wood, that it would help
the blade slide around the tight curves. which makes sense when you think about it.
when I was cutting out wood letters to make signs, I struggled a LOT
with the wrong blades in different tools. these are the little things
that we learn as we bump along the Yellow Brick Road.
and we all know that when you make smooth cuts, the less sanding you have to do.
sorry I can’t suggest one blade over the other as I have used so many for different things.
[IMO – the higher horsepower and tension on the blade will result in less blade wander].
looking forward to seeing AG’s project that requires thick cherry stock like that !!!

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View steve104c's profile

steve104c

52 posts in 1503 days


#15 posted 01-19-2019 09:41 PM

The more teeth, a more smoother finish. Less teeth faster cuts. Resawing blades have fewer teeth. A 1/4” blade is a good blade for tight turns. 1/2” to 3/4” are good for resawing. Skip tooth good for resawing, cuts faster. They have carbide tooth blades, usually a wider blade, for resawing.

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