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Went to Gamble House, need help finding info on splined breadboard on kitchen table

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Forum topic by SMP posted 01-17-2019 06:14 PM 1114 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SMP

304 posts in 173 days


01-17-2019 06:14 PM

I just recently got back from the Gamble House. I was in awe of basically everything in and about that house. Its absolutely amazing craftsmanship. But what caught my eye in something that looked like I could use in the near term, was the kitchen island/table. It had breadboard ends that looked like through tenons, and pegs, more than I’ve seen before. Plus a spline, which may be fake? I had trouble finding pictures online except for further away. And all the Greene and Greene “inspired” furniture I have found online look nothing like this. Does anyone know the table I am talking about and can provide more input on the joinery, especially the breadboards. I have some up close pics on my phone I can try to upload if that helps. Thanks in advance, as I will be starting my new kitchen island/dining table soon.

https://gamblehouse.org/wp-content/gallery/interior/porter-kitchen-table.jpg


9 replies so far

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EarlS

2298 posts in 2616 days


#1 posted 01-17-2019 06:29 PM

Check out Darrell Peart’s books on G&G, some of the best ones out there. William Ng has some very helpful instructional videos as well. Robert lang also has some G&G books that are quite good.

From your picture, I’d say you should be able to figure out a decent approach to the Gamble house island construction by reading these books. Beyond that, look up G&G in the LJ archives. There are a lot of projects and blogs as well.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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SMP

304 posts in 173 days


#2 posted 01-17-2019 07:23 PM



Check out Darrell Peart s books on G&G, some of the best ones out there. William Ng has some very helpful instructional videos as well. Robert lang also has some G&G books that are quite good.

From your picture, I d say you should be able to figure out a decent approach to the Gamble house island construction by reading these books. Beyond that, look up G&G in the LJ archives. There are a lot of projects and blogs as well.

- EarlS

Thanks so much for the names, watched some William Ng videos and found he has a table class an hour and a half away from where I live, for $1200 all materials included. This looks like exactly what I am trying to figure out the methodology and also the point of the holes etc. I guess some are just fake plugs, and some to hide screws? In this video if you skip to 3:14 on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns9vGBDAziM

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Phil32

404 posts in 171 days


#3 posted 01-17-2019 07:37 PM

Many Lumberjocks may not be familiar with Gamble House, located in Pasadena, CA.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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SMP

304 posts in 173 days


#4 posted 01-17-2019 07:57 PM

Here are some pics I took for reference. I particularly liked this table as its less pronounced, more subtle. A lot of the G&G “inspired” stuff is overdone IMO and seem to only use ebony splines and plugs, whereas the actual stuff in the house varied depending on the wood used on the main piece. And the splines much smaller.

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pottz

4080 posts in 1252 days


#5 posted 01-17-2019 11:21 PM

if you like g&g style the gamble house is the disneyland of woodworking,i really need to get back again.for those that do go look for the tour given by jim ipeckjian its about 3 hrs and goes into detail about the house the greene brothers and how they made the furniture.jim has tremendous knowledge of there style and has recreated furniture for the blacker house,another g&g home in pasadena.
darrell peart is a lj,s member so im sure if you pm him with questions he will help you out.i used his books when i built a g&g style hall table.he,s a master of the stlyle.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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sras

4986 posts in 3397 days


#6 posted 01-17-2019 11:24 PM

Thanks for sharing those photos! You’re right, most of the time I see high contrast ebony splines & plugs. I like the look, but it is good to see there is a bigger range to the style.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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SMP

304 posts in 173 days


#7 posted 01-17-2019 11:57 PM



Thanks for sharing those photos! You re right, most of the time I see high contrast ebony splines & plugs. I like the look, but it is good to see there is a bigger range to the style.

- sras

The guide was trying to remember the combos but he wasn’t sure. He thought teak and mahogany got ebony plugs. Some got walnut plugs. I think some got cherry. Maybe it was the maple like this piece.

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SMP

304 posts in 173 days


#8 posted 01-18-2019 12:00 AM



if you like g&g style the gamble house is the disneyland of woodworking,i really need to get back again.for those that do go look for the tour given by jim ipeckjian its about 3 hrs and goes into detail about the house the greene brothers and how they made the furniture.jim has tremendous knowledge of there style and has recreated furniture for the blacker house,another g&g home in pasadena.

I looked at that, but only once a month and i believe $80 per person. I brought the whole family as part of a Warner Brothers tour. The day didn’t work out with our schedule, plus $320 for us 4 was kind of steep. My wife said maybe she’ll send me alone for my Birthday for that tour.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

580 posts in 2482 days


#9 posted 01-18-2019 05:29 AM

SMP,

I believe you’re overthinking it a bit. Screws were used in actual G&G pieces but normally hidden.

I would basically install the breadboard using a non-continuous spline with gaps for screws. The screws go through the breadboard end and are hidden by the decorative insets. Center screw goes in tight and the other screws get a slotted hole in the breadboard under the inserts and tightened just enough to hold stuff tight but allowing the end to expand across.

The central spline area can be glued and the rest just provides structural support for the breadboard end. The ends of the spline on each side gets a little treatment to make it look good.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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