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50 for 50 - turning 50 as I turn 50 #2: Project 2 - A lesson on drying of turning blanks

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Blog entry by mnguy posted 01-14-2019 03:29 PM 677 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Project 3 - I'm dyeing here! Part 2 of 50 for 50 - turning 50 as I turn 50 series Part 3: Project 1 - new lathe, old design »

About a year and a half ago, a friend who is a tree trimmer gave me a ~5’ length of cherry log that had saved and stored by his garage for many months. I cut it into lengths roughly equal to the diameter and let them sit. I figured since the log had been sitting for a year or so, I didn’t need to coat the end of the segments with Armorseal. Well, that was a bad assumption – every chunk of log cracked badly. Lesson learned.

I split the section on the band saw, made a flat face on each side on the jointer, and roughed out a blank on the band saw. Having worked around the major crack by splitting the chunk along it, I now had to deal with small cracks in the blank and with a missing chunk at the rim. Since the blank was already quite small, I filled the missing area with tinted epoxy. I applied cyanoacrylate to the small cracks to firm them up, which worked quite well. There was one crack that came into the rim that did not want to close up. I resorted to filling it with CA and then using the tail stock as a clamp. There is still a little snick where the crack meets the rim, but it seems solid enough.

Finish is Shellawax.

I have been a 100% carbide turning tool guy, but am starting to explore steel tools. I have a set of rough steel turning tools I picked up a couple years before I even had a lathe, and I cleaned up the scraper and put it a burr on it with a Lee Valley burnisher. I believe I got a better surface than with carbide alone, and I look forward to using my two scrapers more on future projects.




5 comments so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8159 posts in 1406 days


#1 posted 01-14-2019 07:02 PM

Dang if that doesn’t sound familiar! Here’s a bowl I made for a Christmas gift from some Cherry I got last summer.

And I did seal it with Anchorseal within 48 hours of it being cut. Ya win some and ya loose some! ;-) On a happy note, the bowl was very well received specifically because of all the dyed epoxy :-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View mnguy's profile

mnguy

216 posts in 3666 days


#2 posted 01-15-2019 02:46 PM

HokieKen, I love the effect of the dyed epoxy! I should have opened the one crack to the right of the rim chipout and filled that with epoxy, too. It would have looked better and I wouldn’t have chased it with CA. Every turning project is a learning experience!

View crb's profile

crb

31 posts in 677 days


#3 posted 01-18-2019 02:43 PM

That looks great. I’ve been filling small cracks with ca but not had luck with big ones. What kind of epoxy and dye did you use?

-- Tighten it until it breaks, then back off a quarter turn!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8159 posts in 1406 days


#4 posted 01-18-2019 05:11 PM

I use Alumilite Amazing Clear Cast 2-part epoxy. And I just use liquid food coloring to dye it. There are dyes made specifically for the resin though that most people use.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View mnguy's profile

mnguy

216 posts in 3666 days


#5 posted 01-21-2019 02:03 PM

crb, I used Locktite 5 minute epoxy and some Transtint colorant. I almost reached for some System 3, but I only needed a little bit, I was just trying to get something finished, and I also didn’t want to have to take the bowl off and futz with a lot of tape dams for the lower viscosity System 3. With the thicker Locktite, I just the big gap at the bottom and put some tape under it, then filled that. I also used Locktite 30 minute CA, which is too thick. I since learned the trick of pushing some sawdust into the cracks and using thinner bodied CA to wick in and bond the dust as a crack filler + stabilizer. I will try that on the next blank from this branch.

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